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3 Tips for Exercising When You’re on Oxygen

8 Feb 2018
| Under COPD, Exercise, Lifestyle, Lung Disease, Tips | Posted by | 12 Comments
3 Ways to Exercise When You're On Oxygen

If you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, exercise may be the last thing you want to do.

You’re already tired to begin with, so the idea of working up a sweat probably isn’t too appealing. Plus, when you’re short of breath, doing something that makes it even harder to breathe seems like it would do more harm than good.

However, the COPD Foundation shares that, as long as your doctor says it’s okay, exercise is encouraged. Not to reverse your lung disease, because it can’t, but because it can “change the way you feel, breathe, and function,” ultimately giving you a higher quality of life.

Admittedly, if your COPD is advanced enough that you’re on oxygen, this may make it harder to engage in physical activity, but it certainly doesn’t make it impossible to get some fitness into your life.

Here are three things you can do (after you get your doctor’s approval, of course) to build your strength and endurance, even if you have an oxygen tank.

  1. Do leg exercises that don’t require you to move around, such as leg extensions or calf raises. These movements can help you build muscle in your lower body so it’s easier to get around.
  2. Do arm exercises that don’t require a lot of movement, like bicep curls and triceps extensions. You’ll likely find it easier to move your oxygen tank over time because you’ll get stronger.
  3. Perform slow, low-impact cardiovascular exercises to build your endurance without being too taxing on your lungs. Some options to consider include yoga, tai chi, or riding a stationary bike at slower speeds.

Be sure to continue to breathe slowly during your exercises and, if you start to feel worse, stop immediately and don’t work out again until you see your doctor for clearance.

Also, when getting approval to exercise, your doctor may suggest that you change the oxygen flow rate during your workout sessions. However, you should never do this without talking to your doctor first and being told what that flow rate change should be.

If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic disease like COPD, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or other symptoms of lung disease, the Lung Institute offers a variety of cellular treatment options. Contact us today at (800) 729-3065 or fill out the form to see if you qualify for cellular therapy, and find out what cellular therapy could mean for you.

Interested in our article on exercising while on oxygen? Share your thoughts and comments below.

12 Comments

  1. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Robin:

    Thank you for the comment and enlightening story. You inspire us to continue our work, and we hope you may inspire others to seek out our treatments.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Robin Hale

    2 months ago

    Hi! It’s been a little over two years since I had my cell transplant. I am still on oxygen, but something wonderful happened to me while having my procedure. On the morning of the third day, I woke up with no pain. I TOLD nIKKI AT THE CENTER ABOUT MY PAIN DISAPPEARING. I HAD SUFFERED FROM SEVERE JOINT PAIN SINCE 1980, AND NEVER A DAY PASSED THAT I DIDN’T SUFFER. I WANT TO SAY, ‘ tHANK YOU,’ BECAUSE EVEN THOUGH I AM STILL ON OXYGEN 24/7, I am able to do many more things than before and I don’t have pain ANYMORE. whatever THE STEM CELL TRANSPLANT DID, IT FIXED MY JOINT PAIN, too.

  3. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Thea:

    Congratulations on working hard to stay active and healthy. We applaud you for your efforts. Anytime we can share a story like yours with others makes us very happy.

    We’re also happy to answer your questions about cellular therapy, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  4. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Bob:

    Thank you for your comment. We have written articles about staying hydrated if you have a lung disease. We have not heard anyone suggest you could drink too much water, but if your doctor has an opinion, then we respect that. You might consult other doctors and see if they concur.

    We’re happy to answer your questions about cellular therapy for chronic lung diseases. We have a dedicated medical team who have a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment options, candidacy, cost and more. So, feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  5. Bob T Ponder

    2 months ago

    I RECENTLY CHANGED PULMONOLOGIST DUE TO A CHANGE IN LOCATION. tHIS NEW DOCTOR TOLD ME NOT TO DRINK TOO MUCH WATER, AND NOT TO DRINK IT JUST TO MEET THE MINIMUM 64 OZ. i HAVE ALWAYS BEEN TOLD i SHOULD DRINK AT LEAST 64 OZ PER DAY.. wHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS? hE SAID ANYONE WITH COPD SHOULD JUST DRINK WHEN THIRSTY, NOT TO MEET SOME KIND OF MINIMUM.

  6. theabrandt

    2 months ago

    I AM 88 years old and have practiced yoga for 40 years. I have
    also been on oxygen 24/7 for 10 YEARS. sTILL DO SHOULDER STAND,
    PLOW, BRIDGE , FULL LOTUS, FORWARD BEND. forward bend, aLSO WALK AROUND MY ONE STORY HOUSE FOR 5 -9 minutes. Practice breathing. also lift
    3 pound weights. Still cook. my laundry. Because of these
    activities am still pretty active. Still go out to dinner
    occasionally.

  7. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Susie:

    Pulmonary hypertension is not one of the main diseases we treat with our cellular treatment options. We would suggest you contact one of our patient coordinators and discuss your situation with one of them.

    We’re happy to answer your questions about cellular treatment, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with one of our patient coordinators. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  8. Susie

    2 months ago

    Is there cell therapy for pulmonary hypertension?

  9. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Dennis:

    We are hoping to have meetings with the VA in the near future. For now, treatments at the VA are traditional treatments that address symptoms and not progression.

    Our team has a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment, candidacy and cost. We’re happy to answer your questions. Feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with our dedicated medical team. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  10. Dennis Bachand

    2 months ago

    I recently saw a write up on the lung institute in the VFW quarterly magazine. I also know and as a veteran of foreign war have been offered a generous $500.00 off the regular cost for treatment, ” and I thank you” but still can’t even come close to being able to afford treatment. My question is, why can’t treatment be administered with-in the veterans affairs hospitals??

  11. Lung Institute

    2 months ago

    Tony:

    Unfortunately, at this time, Medicare, Medicaid and insurance companies don’t cover treatment. However, we’re hopeful that treatment will be covered in the near future. Keep in mind that it will take some time before the insurance companies see a financial benefit in their favor and then decide to cover it. We’re happy to answer your questions about cellular therapy for chronic lung diseases. We have a dedicated medical team who have a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment options, candidacy, cost and more. So, feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  12. Tony mcguffin

    2 months ago

    Do insurance companies cover the cellular treatments? I had a 5 month battle with severe bronchitis, from late MAY, 2017 until November. I was told by my Dr. That I now have COpd.

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