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4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

29 Feb 2016
| Under COPD, Lifestyle, Lung Disease, Postitivity | Posted by | 4 Comments
4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

We all need a little inspiration sometimes…

Living with a lung disease such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease can change your entire outlook on life. Not only can the disease be debilitating physically – turning a simple walk to the mailbox into an exhausting expedition – but can often affect it’s suffers mentally, crushing all ambition and hope. When battling lung disease, nutrition, exercise, and willpower are key to improving one’s quality of life, but finding the strength to change can be difficult.

With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to present 4 stories to Inspire Those with COPD. It’s time to feel empowered again.

4. Theodore Roosevelt

4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt was born sickly and pale. Suffering from a debilitating asthma, he frequently suffered nighttime attacks and likened the experience to feeling smothered to death. Doctors could provide no cure. While hiking with his family in the Alps, he realized he could keep up with his father, noting that through strenuous physical exertion, his respiratory condition could improve. With this discovery, Roosevelt’s life and health changed dramatically, embracing an active lifestyle as a naturalist and outdoorsmen.

Living by the words his father left him before he died: “take care of your morals first, your health next, and finally your studies”- Theodore Roosevelt would go on to become the 26th President on the United States. During his time as President, he championed the “square deal”, broke up trusts, regulated the railroads, set standards for our food and drugs, established our national park service, and promoted economic and social opportunity for all.

3. Earvin “Magic” Johnson Jr.

4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

Earvin “Magic” Johnson was deeply influenced by his parents strong work influence. Magic excelled at basketball at an early age. In his first year in the NBA, he took the Lakers to the championship and won the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player award, taking the Lakers to four more championships throughout the 1980s.

In 1991, Magic Johnson contracted HIV and abruptly retired from the NBA. At a time when HIV was considered a death sentence, and the stigma of the disease was at that time still closely associated with homosexuality, Magic Johnson was left in a humiliating and hopeless situation. Choosing to empower rather than be lost in despair, Johnson made it his mission to educate others on HIV and AIDS. Despite the protests of his fellow players and teammates, Johnson represented the 1992 Men’s Olympic Basketball team taking them to the gold. Today he is honored as one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history.

2. JK Rowling

4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

At a young age JK Rowling had a passion for storytelling, often writing fantasy stories to read to her sister. At the age of 25, Rowling was fundamentally changed upon the death of her mother after years of battling multiple sclerosis. Seven years after graduating from University, she saw her life as a failure: her marriage had failed, she was unemployed with a child, had contemplated suicide, and was on state welfare.

Needing a place that she could get her daughter to fall asleep, Rowling began writing in cafes. After submitting the novel to twelve publishing houses, she was rejected each time. After a year, she finally caught a break. Today JK Rowling is the first person to become a billionaire by writing books, and went from living on state benefits to multi-millionaire status within five years.

1. Oprah Winfrey

4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD

Oprah Winfrey was born into poverty in rural Mississippi to a teenage single mother. Starting at the age of nine, she was molested by her uncle, cousins, and a family friend. At the age of 14 she became pregnant, but lost her child shortly after giving birth. Finding an opportunity to go to a more affluent high school in a suburban neighborhood, her poverty was a constant source of ridicule in the face of her other classmates. Despite this, Oprah made education her top priority and became quite popular as a result.

In the years that followed, Oprah chased opportunity, landing a job in radio while still in high school, and moving to a daytime-talk show after boosting a third-rated Chicago talk show to first place. Although Oprah has had her challenges – struggling with her weight and depression her whole life – today she is the richest African American of the 20th century, and North America’s first black multi-billionaire.

Although living with lung disease can feel as if you have no options, inspiration for personal change can often come out of hardship and struggle. If you’re looking to take control of your health, don’t wait.

If you or a loved one suffers from COPD or another lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of stem cell treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 today to find out if you qualify for stem cell therapy.

Feeling inspired? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts and comments on our 4 Stories to Inspire Those with COPD below.

4 Comments

  1. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Ruthie,

    We agree with you that COPD is a very difficult disease to live with and causes many people a lot of pain. Smoking causes a lot of other illnesses as well, including COPD. So, it’s best for smokers to quit smoking. However, nobody is to blame for developing any sort of illness. While there’s no cure for COPD at the time, there are ways to manage symptoms, including medications, oxygen therapy and alternative treatments, like stem cell therapy. While COPD, heart disease and other diseases are very challenging to have and live with, there are inspiring stories out there. Check out this blog article about COPD athletes by clicking here. Like you, we hope that one day a cure for COPD and other chronic lung diseases will be found. In the meantime, we’re happy to answer any questions you have regarding stem cell treatment options. Because stem cell therapy works to promote healing from within, many patients feel better, breathe easier and have an improved quality of life after treatment. So, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149, and we look forward to speaking with you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Ruthie church

    5 months ago

    I guess if you have COPD, there is no inspiration, for us. Just stories and videos of pain and suffering. Gee, it’s a millenniums old disease and they still don’t have a cure, just repeated…research. Makes you really suspect. They want to say smokers deserve this, what about the heart disease, colon, lymphoma, pancreatic, the list goes on about all the diseases and cancers caused by smoking. And. the heart….they can pretty much fix that. But, only 15% of smokers get COPD…what about the other 85%?? There most probably is a cure….we just make too many people alot of money….this is the ONLY disease that the stock brokers watch. So, we are inspirational. Blessings to all…..let’s pray alot….a cure is of the essence.

  3. Art George

    9 months ago

    I thought the inspirational stories would be about COPD !

  4. Drew

    9 months ago

    I don’t get the connection .. Would be more Inspiring .. if they showed Awareness of PF and COPD

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