The official blog of the Lung Institute.

5 Oxygen-Friendly Outdoor Activities

3 Nov 2015
| Under Lifestyle, Lung Disease, Oxygen Levels | Posted by | 13 Comments

Ready to get outside and get active?

A Breath of Fresh Air

For those who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), finding outdoor activities that don’t exacerbate symptoms can be a difficult endeavor. It can be difficult to find areas free of air pollutants and pollens, and the physical exertion of the activity itself can be painfully demanding. However, the fact remains that physical activity is crucial to maintaining lung function and cognitive health. With this in mind, the Lung Institute has compiled a list of 5 oxygen-friendly outdoor activities that will keep you healthy without feeling out of breath.

5. Tai Chi

Tai Chi is a low-impact, slow-motion exercise, emphasizing controlled breathing and balance. As we’ve mentioned before every day there is growing evidence that Tai Chi has value in treating or preventing health problems. Perhaps the most endearing quality of the art form is that you can start it even if you aren’t in the best shape.

4. Gardening

Studies have shown that gardening is one of healthiest activities you can do in your own backyard. According to the CDC, 2.5 hours of gardening each week can reduce the risk for obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, heart disease, stroke, depression, colon cancer and premature death. Whether you’re starting small with a few potted plants or building up your own vineyard, the practice of gardening is known to promote patience and mental stimulation through the act of caretaking.

3. Walking

Walking is one of the best methods of moderate exercise available. In a study conducted between 1970 and 2007, walking reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 31% and cut the risk of dying during the study period by 32%. Regardless of your current level of health, start off slow, the American Heart Association calls for 30 minutes of regular walking five days a week, so be sure to pace yourself.

2. Yoga

Even though the term yoga is widely known, what many fail to realize are the significant benefits it provides to the body and mind. Yoga- an exercise form that combines controlled breathing, stretching exercises, and relaxation- mixes physicality and mental endurance to form the manifestation of harmony within the body and mind. Start off with a few simple poses and work on your breathing. You’ll feel enlightened in no time.

1. Fishing

Fishing is inherently less physically demanding, instead requiring dexterity and knowledge of fishing areas, bait, tackle, and casting techniques. Through this mental stimulation, cognitive connectivity is promoted.  In terms of the physical effects of fishing, simply being outdoors and in the sun gives the body Vitamin D, benefitting both the brain and the body.


If you or a loved one suffers from COPD, or any lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of stem cell treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 to find out if you qualify for stem cell therapy.

Looking to get outside and get active? Tell us about your experience! Share your thoughts and comments on our 5 Oxygen-Friendly Outdoor Activities below…


  1. PB

    5 months ago

    Hello Mary,

    Thanks for your question. There is not an age limit that would disqualify someone from treatment. However, it’s important to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with one of our patient coordinators regarding candidacy, stem cell treatment options and to have your questions answered. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Mary

    5 months ago

    Is there an age limit that would disqualify one for treatment?

  3. James

    7 months ago

    Last stages of emphysema

  4. Cameron Kennerly

    7 months ago

    Hello Ruth,

    Thanks for your question! Unfortunately however, at this time treatment is not yet covered by traditional insurance companies, though we are optimistic that it will be covered soon. As far as the cost of treatment, it is wholly dependent on the health and stage of the patient. To get more information on cost, the procedure, and what treatment could mean for your quality of life, please reach out to us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with one of our patient coordinators today.

    We look forward to hearing from you,

    -The Lung Institute

  5. Ruth Marshall

    7 months ago

    Is this stem cell treatment covered by insurance? (The blood one) and is it very expensive?

  6. PB

    8 months ago

    Hi Sandra,

    With clinics nationwide including in Nashville, TN; Tampa, FL; Pittsburgh, PA; Scottsdale, AZ; and soon Dallas, TX, there are many Lung Institute clinic locations. Because you live in Los Angeles, the closest Lung Institute location is in Scottsdale, AZ. For more information about stem cell treatment options at the Lung Institute, please feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with one of our patient coordinators. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  7. sandra goldsobel

    8 months ago

    The blood treatment sounds better than the bone marrow treatment. I live in Los Angeles is there any place doing this here?. I have to get a new doctor . Can you recommend one in west l. a. or Beverly hills? I would like more information about this. No doctor will here will go to another state.

  8. Pingback: Lung Institute| Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

  9. Barbara Carpenter

    12 months ago

    Love the walking and Tai Chi. Have been maintaining my interstitial lung disease with those and lots of breathing exercises, regular acupuncture treatments and meditation. If you can’t find a “Better Breathers” group see about forming one!

  10. Cameron Kennerly

    12 months ago


    That’s great to hear! Tai Chi is an excellent art form for building flexibility, balance, and controlled breathing. It’s amazingly graceful as well! Glad it’s working out for you and keep us updated on your progress!

    -The Lung Institute

  11. Colleen Zucco

    12 months ago

    I started TaiChi before reading this and was so happy you talked about it here. I think it is a wonderful way to exercise. I knew I had to do something and finding this saved me. It doesn’t take a long time and it loosens my body up enough to want to move around and get things done. I actually look forward to it everyday!

  12. Cameron Kennerly

    12 months ago

    Hello Joan,

    Unfortunately we are unable to recommend medicine to you, and would suggest that you discuss any new medications with your primary physician. However, if you are interested in stem cell therapy as a form of alternative treatment, please give us a call at 1-855-313-1149 to speak to one of our patient coordinators. It may be possible to find alternative solutions.

    Hope to hear from you soon,


  13. Joan

    12 months ago

    I have a hypersensitivity to an unknown allergen. There is scar tissue and inflammation. Prednisone is not working. Taking Imuran now. Any suggestions?

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

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