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The official blog of the Lung Institute.

5 Tips for Golfing with Lung Disease

16 Jun 2015
| Under COPD, Lifestyle, Lung Disease | Posted by | 1 Comment
5 Tips for Golfing with Lung Disease

Can you Golf with COPD?

America’s favorite pastime may be baseball, but for many seniors, the golf course is a second home. Many retirees dream of spending their days between the rolling green hills and manicured landscapes. However, given that 13 percent of the senior population suffers from debilitating lung diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the idea that golfing with lung disease feels like false hope. However, with a few modifications to your playing style, golfing with COPD can not only be a reality, but also a healthy exercise option to help you stay active and promote healthy lung function. Here are 5 tips for golfing with lung disease:

Golfing Tips

Stretch

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Before you start playing, make sure to stretch out your arms and legs thoroughly. This will help you stay limber and not over work your muscles, which will keep your heart rate down, and your breathing in check.

Take a Cart

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A cart will allow you to not only get a break in between shots, but will keep you moving quickly and also keep you out of the sun. Many courses will offer a handicap flag as well so you can park your cart closer to (but not on) the greens.

Allow Others to Play Through

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Always have your etiquette cap on while playing golf, especially if you are prone to slow play. Be cautious and courteous and let quicker golfers play through. Nothing is more frustrating than someone hitting into your group, so save yourself the frustration.

Keep up Rate of Play

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Most courses have a time limits posted for how long if should take you to play nine holes. Make sure you stay close with the group in front of you. This may mean letting a few errant shots stay in the bushes and fewer practice swings. Another great tip is to play “ready golf.” regardless of who’s turn it is, if someone else in your group is ready to play, let them hit.

Rest at the Turn

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Most courses allow for 10 or 15 minutes to rest at the turn. Use that time to sit and drink some water. If you need more than the allotted time, take it. All you will lose is your place in line. You can easily return to the game where there is a gap.

Treating COPD with Stem Cells

Of course, for those suffering form end stage COPD, golfing may be out of the question. But this doesn’t always need to be the case. There is a possibility that an alternative treatment for COPD like stem cell therapy can get you back to the things that you enjoy in life. Using cells from your own body, doctors can now help expedite the body’s internal healing system with stem cell therapy.

If you or a loved one suffers from lung disease and would like to get back out on the golf course, the Lung Institute may be able to help. Contact us by calling (800) 729-3065 to see if you qualify. We may not be able to help you with your golf game, but we might be able to get you back out on the course.

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

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