Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Do You Have COPD? 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

22 Feb 2018
| Under COPD, FAQs, Lung Disease | Posted by | 2 Comments
Do You Have COPD_ 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

The only way to know for sure if you have COPD is to go to the doctor and get a breath test (called a spirometry), a chest x-ray, or a chest CT scan. However, one piece of research has also discovered that there are five questions that could also be good indicators that your breathing troubles are related to COPD.

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Lifetime TV’s “Access Health” Touts Lung Institute’s Stem Cell Therapy

Lifetime_TV’s_Access_Health_Touts_Lung_Institute’s_Stem_Cell_Therapy

The Lung Institute got a chance to tell its remarkable story to a national television audience in early November. Lifetime TV’s “Access Health” featured Dr. James St. Louis, Lung Institute senior medical advisor, discussing the innovative stem cell therapy that has helped many people address the progression of their COPD and do more than just…

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5 Leading COPD FAQS for Caregivers

4 Nov 2017
| Under COPD, Disease Education, FAQs, Lung Disease, Medical | Posted by | 13 Comments
5 Leading COPD FAQS for Caregivers

The circumstances of being a caregiver can be incredibly difficult to overcome. Although there is a sense of duty and responsibility to those we love and care for, we must achieve a balance between our own lives, work, and family and the well-being of those in our care. With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to give you a breakdown on the 5 Leading COPD FAQs for Caregivers, and lend a helping hand of support for those feeling overwhelmed.

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COPD and Memory Loss

Scientific Findings about COPD and Memory Loss In the 1990s researchers at the Mayo Clinic studied the connection between lung function and dementia risk. Since then, more recent studies have indicated an increased risk of memory loss and dementia as a result of diminished lung function and chronic lung disease. A 15-year study published in 2011 suggested that…

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Is Silicosis Fatal?

Is Silicosis Fatal?

Yes, silicosis can be fatal. This respiratory disease is caused by inhaling crystalline silica dust, which produces inflammation and scarring when it settles into the lungs. As time passes, this scarring causes the lungs to stiffen. Silicosis is associated with various symptoms that tend to worsen over time, the most common of which include coughing,…

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How Does Emphysema Affect Lung Function?

How Does Emphysema Affect Lung Function?

Emphysema affects lung function in three main ways. First, emphysema causes holes to gradually form inside the lungs’ air sacs, thereby weakening their internal structure and inhibiting the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Second, emphysema damages the elasticity of the airways that lead to the air sacs, causing the air sacs to collapse and…

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What Medications are Prescribed for COPD?

What medications are prescribed for COPD?

The medications prescribed for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) depend on the type of symptoms that a patient is experiencing, as well as their frequency and severity. COPD, which is a category of diseases including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is characterized by restricted airflow into and out of the lungs, resulting in shortness of breath…

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Blood Oxygen Level: Is My Oxygen Level Normal?

31 Jul 2017
| Under FAQs, Oxygen Levels | Posted by | 4 Comments
Blood Oxygen Level: Is My Oxygen Level Normal?

The ability to understand and measure your blood oxygen levels is a critical skill for those with chronic lung disease. By knowing what your oxygen level is, you can change your behavior in order to address and change it. With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to break down your Blood Oxygen Level: Is My Oxygen Level Normal?

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Common COPD Terms: Understanding What They Mean

Common COPD Terms: Understanding What They Mean

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common lung disease that affects around 24 million people in the United States. When you’re diagnosed with COPD, your doctor might use terms that are new. To be able to treat your condition, you need to be able to understand the lingo. To help, we have put together…

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

Under current FDA guidelines and regulations 1271.10 and 1271.15, the Lung Institute complies with all necessary requirements for operation. The Lung Institute is firmly in accordance with the conditions set by the FDA for exemption status and conducts itself in full accordance with current guidelines. Any individual who accesses Lung Institute's website for information is encouraged to speak with his or her primary physician for treatment suggestions and conclusive evidence. All information on this site should be used for educational and informational use only.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and stem cell procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.