Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Chronic Bronchitis Treatment Options and You

Chronic Bronchitis Treatment Options and You

When it comes to living with chronic bronchitis, finding the right treatment options for you can be challenging. Inhalers, medications, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, stem cell therapy and lifestyle changes may be recommended as chronic bronchitis treatment options. But, how do you know which could work best for you? We’re here to help by bringing you the information you need about chronic bronchitis treatment options.

Chronic Bronchitis and How It Affects Your Lungs

Chronic bronchitis and emphysema are two conditions that contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Emphysema gradually destroys the lungs’ tiny air sacs (alveoli), making it progressively more difficult to breathe. In chronic bronchitis, the lungs’ airways become inflamed, leading to increased mucus production. Often, people with chronic bronchitis have a wet and painful cough.

Chronic Bronchitis Treatment Options and How They Work

Chronic bronchitis treatment options vary from person to person. You and your doctor will work together to develop the best chronic bronchitis treatment plan for you. Your doctor may recommend pulmonary function tests, such as spirometry, lung plethysmography or a 6-minute walk test to help your doctor determine how to proceed. However, there are some common chronic bronchitis treatments.

Inhalers

Inhalers are one of the most common forms of chronic bronchitis treatment options. Bronchodilators can be short-acting or long-acting and work by opening the airways. Short-acting bronchodilators, or rescue inhalers, work to relieve sudden chronic bronchitis symptoms. Long-acting bronchodilators work to control chronic bronchitis symptoms over time.

Sometimes, doctors prescribe combination inhalers. Combination inhalers combine two different types of medications into one inhaler. Often, they combine an oral corticosteroid to reduce inflammation and a bronchodilator to open the airways.

Medications

In addition to inhalers, your doctor may recommend other types of medications. For example, antibiotics may be needed to address an infection. People with chronic bronchitis are more prone to infections, so it’s important to see your doctor regularly. Theophylline may also be to help relax the muscles in your airways and to reduce shortness of breath. Sometimes, oral corticosteroids may be prescribed to help reduce inflammation within the lungs and airways.

Oxygen Therapy

Because chronic lung diseases make breathing difficult, many people have trouble maintaining an adequate blood oxygen level. All cells, organs and tissues in the body need plenty of oxygen in order to function properly. If there’s not enough oxygen, hypoxemia can occur. If needed, doctors prescribe oxygen therapy to help people maintain a healthy blood oxygen level and get the oxygen they need.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation

Some doctors recommend pulmonary rehabilitation to help their patients learn how to breathe and function better. During pulmonary rehabilitation, you will work with a team of doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, counselors and trained medical staff. They will work with you to help you improve your physical condition and learn how to manage your chronic lung disease. Pulmonary rehabilitation combines education, exercise and support to its participants.

Stem Cell Therapy

Stem cell therapy is a newer chronic bronchitis treatment option that uses a person’s own stem cells to help promote healing from within the lungs. For some people, stem cell therapy has helped them return to their favorite activities, like going to dinner with friends, playing games with their grandchildren and doing more household chores. Stem cell therapy may address disease progression and may improve quality of life.

Lifestyle Changes

Chronic Bronchitis Treatment Options and You

Often, doctors recommend lifestyle changes to help people with chronic bronchitis improve their overall health. For example, stopping smoking is one of the best steps people can take to improve their overall health and lung health. In order for any of the chronic bronchitis treatment options to work to their fullest, being smoke-free is essential. Along with quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise may also have a significant effect on your health.

The key is to start small and build up over time. Talk with your doctor about what types and amounts of exercise are right for you. If you can only walk to the mailbox and back at first, that’s a good place to start. Set goals for yourself to walk to the mailbox and back a certain amount of times each day and increase your walking time and distance slowly and as directed by your doctor.

In addition to exercise, eating a diet rich in healthy proteins, fruits, vegetables and plenty of water can make a world of difference. Drinking plenty of water may help thin mucus, which makes it easier to cough up. Consider eating more grilled or baked chicken and fish, nuts, beans, citrus, a variety of fruits and vegetables. If you’re unsure about what foods may work best, ask your doctor to recommend a registered dietician to help you create the best diet plan for you.

Taking the Next Steps

Now that you know more about the chronic bronchitis treatment options, you’ll be better prepared to discuss them with your doctor. By learning all you can about your condition, the treatment options and the next steps, you’re being proactive in your healthcare.

Sometimes, it may take some trial and error before finding the treatment plan that works best for you. Remember to take your medications and inhalers exactly as prescribed by your doctor, and always let your doctor know if you see any changes in your overall health or lung health. Often, a combination of chronic bronchitis treatment options are used to achieve the best results possible.

If you feel like it’s time to try something new in your chronic bronchitis treatment plan, it may be time to consider stem cell therapy. Our medical staff can walk you through the process every step of the way and are happy to answer your questions. If you or a loved one has chronic bronchitis, emphysema, COPD or another chronic lung disease and would like to learn more about stem cell therapy, contact us at (800) 729-3065.

6 Comments

  1. Lung Institute

    3 months ago

    Rudland:

    Thank you for the nice comments and we are glad to hear you are doing well since the treatments.

    Please contact one of our patient coordinators regarding your specific case as they will be better informed to discuss your question. Contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with our knowledgeable medical team. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Thanks,

    Lung Institute

  2. Rudland Ingles

    5 months ago

    Hello, It HAS BEEN TWO YEARS SINCE MY STEM CELL THERAPY, i AM STILL ENJOYING THE IMPROVEMENTS THE THERAPY HAS MADE TO MY LIFE. iN ALL THE TESTSIMONIALS I HAVE READ I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW AVERAGELY HOW LONG IT CAN last. my experience from start to finish at your facility in Tampa was first rate.
    Best regards
    Rudland Ingles

  3. Phoebe

    7 months ago

    Hi Ray,

    The Lung Institute has clinics located nationwide in Dallas, TX; Tampa, FL; Pittsburgh, PA; Nashville, TN and Scottsdale, AZ. Treatment cost varies depending on treatment type, so to best answer your question, we will need more medical information from you. Feel free to contact us to speak one-on-one with our dedicated medical staff over our secure phone line by calling (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  4. Ray

    7 months ago

    What is average cost, and where is treatment done.

  5. Matt

    8 months ago

    Hello Linda,
    Thank you for your question. There is no age limit for receiving stem cell therapy. If you have any specific question or want to see if you’re a candidate for treatment, please give us a call at (855) 313-1149. Thanks again and have a great day.

  6. Linda

    8 months ago

    I have heard that stem cell replacement really does not work on persons in third 70’s and 80’s

Your Comment

Your email address will not be published.



* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

Under current FDA guidelines and regulations 1271.10 and 1271.15, the Lung Institute complies with all necessary requirements for operation. The Lung Institute is firmly in accordance with the conditions set by the FDA for exemption status and conducts itself in full accordance with current guidelines. Any individual who accesses Lung Institute's website for information is encouraged to speak with his or her primary physician for treatment suggestions and conclusive evidence. All information on this site should be used for educational and informational use only.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and stem cell procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.