Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Exercising with Lung Disease

9 Jan 2015
| Under Lifestyle, Lung Disease | Posted by
| 4 Comments
Exercising with Lung Disease

Going to the gym every day often may seem like a chore to many individuals. However, this is the type of activity that most people with lung disease wish they could partake in more often. People who have lung disease typically cannot exercise as much. However, this doesn’t mean they should not exercise at all. Years ago, doctors told people with diseases such as COPD that they shouldn’t exercise, but now they are encouraging participation in fitness activities because it can be highly beneficial.

There are exercises for everyone and by consulting a physician and a personal trainer, you can create a work out regimen that works best for you and allows you to receive the maximum health benefits without overexerting yourself. Our fitness expert, Elyse, came up with a few ways lung disease patients can still enjoy the benefits of an active lifestyle.

Exercise Recommendations

Elyse recommends low-impact exercises like biking, walking or swimming. This way, you are able to control the amount of intensity you put into each workout and can lessen it if needed. On good days, you may be able to do more than other days, so remember to be flexible and remain positive.

Additionally, there are plenty of other ways to work your muscles. Some options don’t even require you to get up from a chair. One example is remaining seated and swimming your arms back and forth. You can also sit down and do leg marches or calf raises; anything that increases your heart rate is going to benefit your health overall.

How To Get The Benefits of Exercise

Your lungs are a muscle and you need to exercise them like any other muscle. Aerobic exercise can even decrease the feeling of being short of breath. When working out, be sure to pace yourself and know your body; you do not want to overexert yourself. So be sure to take breaks often and pause if you are feeling discomfort. It is possible to exercise with oxygen, so if you are feeling particularly out breath, don’t be afraid to grab your oxygen. Even if you feel that you must rest and take several breaks during an exercise, it’s okay! Take your time and start off slow. In no time, you’ll be feeling a lot better and more capable of taking your workouts to the next level.

Besides helping your muscle groups and improve your cardiovascular health, regular exercise can help combat diseases and other conditions. The healthier you are, the better you will feel. Your body is like a machine—you need to keep it moving and treat it well.

Elyse says that exercise can reduce blood pressure and can also benefit your mental health. She says, “Exercising regularly can help people manage stress and feel happier overall. The better you are to your body, the better you’ll feel and the lower your risk of disease will be. You only have one body, so treat it well.”

If you or someone you love suffers from a debilitating chronic lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) or interstitial lung disease, you may think that a life that includes daily exercise is out of reach. Fortunately, that life can be yours with cellular therapy from the Lung Institute. For more information, contact us or call us at 888-745-6697.

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months of COPD patients.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.