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Home Oxygen Saturation Meter Reviews

17 Jun 2015
| Under COPD, Lung Disease | Posted by | 8 Comments
Home Oxygen Saturation Meter Review

Monitoring blood oxygen levels

For those suffering from chronic lung diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), monitoring your oxygen level is a crucial component of an effective treatment strategy. An oxygen saturation meter, or pulse oximeter, is a great way to stay on top of your blood oxygen level. Pulse oximeters are easy to use, non-invasive and portable. But not all pulse oximeters are created equal. We have taken the guesswork out for you and evaluated the best oximeters on the market. Check out our home oxygen saturation meter reviews below.

How does pulse oximetry work?

Before we get into the details, let’s talk about what oximeters are and how they work. When you breathe oxygen into your lungs, it passes through your lungs and into your bloodstream. The majority of the oxygen attaches to hemoglobin (a protein located inside of your red blood cells) and is transported to all of the tissues in your body via the bloodstream. An oximeter is clipped onto a body part like a finger or ear lobe, and measures the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream. The device shoots light through one side, and the other side reads how much light shines through your skin. Oxygen-rich hemoglobin absorbs more light, so the less light that makes it through your ear lobe or finger, the more oxygen you have in your bloodstream. The pulse oximeter measures the light and converts the information into a digital readout. This helps lung disease sufferers understand when they need to use supplemental oxygen.

What to look for in an oximeter

When shopping for an oximeter, there are some key features that you should look for:

  • Accuracy indicator: Look for an oximeter that utilizes a warning light that lets you know when the reading might be inaccurate.
  • Alarms: Many oximeters are equipped with alarms that alert the user when oxygen saturation level is low.
  • Readability of displayed measurements: Make sure it is easy for you to read and understand the display. Some people prefer certain colors or larger text.
  • Durability and battery life: If you will be using your oximeter frequently, purchase one that can stand a little wear and tear with extended battery life.

Top pulse oximeters

For the sake of this report, we only investigated finger oximeters, which are the most common. Here are the top three oximeters on the market, in our opinion, and price points:

  1. Choicemed Fingertip Pulse Oximeter, $23-35
  2. Contec Medical Systems CMS 50-DL Pulse Oximeter, $17-20
  3. SantaMedical Finger Pulse Oximeter SM-110, $25-100

In addition to pulse oximeters, another tool that you can use is a pulse oximeter app that you can download on your smartphone. The app is $2.99 and requires no additional equipment. Click here to view in the iTunes app store and for a quick description as to how it works.

When living with chronic lung disease, symptom management is key in handling the disorder. Utilizing a pulse oximeter helps you keep your eye on your oxygen level and allow you to supplement accordingly. If you or a loved one is suffering from a lung disease, contact us today at (800) 729-3065 to see if you qualify for stem cell therapy as a treatment option.

8 Comments

  1. Pingback: Lung Institute | Product Review: GrandCare Systems

  2. PB

    7 months ago

    Hi Andy,

    Thanks for your comment and for expressing your concerns. We agree that accuracy is very important when considering which oximeter to purchase, which is why we made sure to list it as the top bullet point. This post is intended to serve as a helpful guide of what to look for when purchasing an oximeter, and we included some specific oximeters, which were selected based on user reviews. In our research, we found that the majority of people who use these three oximeters are very happy with their purchases. Is there an oximeter that has worked well for you that’s not mentioned in the above? If so, please let us know. Of course, we always recommend working directly with your primary care physician to understand which tools will work best for you. Thanks for taking the time to comment and providing your feedback.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  3. Andy

    7 months ago

    I’ve hoped you would explain in your review how you come to these “top choice” conclusion but unfortunately it was not the case. Of cours, for any medical equipment, accuracy is always the most important aspect to consider. What would help a cheap device if it shows your oxygen level titrant wrong or inconsistent? Not only it’s not helpful, it can be downright dangerous!
    So I’m interest in how did you come to recommend these three. Did you compare their measurements with professional equipments to access their accuracy or it was just a gut feeling? And do they have these alarm indicators you mentioned above?
    I think enrich your article with facts will make it immensely more useful.

  4. Cameron Kennerly

    10 months ago

    Hello Jomana,

    Thanks for your comment! We’re sorry to hear about your respiratory health issues. In regards to your question, although we believe that any of the three oxygen meters we’ve listed will be helpful to those trying to monitor their blood oxygen levels, the choice is dependent on your needs as well as your budget.

    For more information consult your primary physician!

    -The Lung Institute

  5. Jomana

    10 months ago

    I have some rare allergy which affect on my breath and i really need this device to monitor the oxygen level on my blood but im really confused about which one i could buy Choicemed Fingertip or CMS 50-DL.
    I read some reviews online and according to the url mentioned in “your website” they recommended CMS 50-DL .
    do you think its the best option ?

  6. Pingback: Lung Institute | How Lung Disease Affects your Heart

  7. Maren Auxier

    1 year ago

    Hi Sheila,

    Thanks for your comment! I can imagine that you’re ready for relief after 30 years. I would recommend going to ClinicalTrials.gov to see if you can get in on a stem cell clinical trial. Of course, with these trials, there is the risk of receiving a placebo, however I think that it is definitely worth checking out. In the meantime, check out our blog for some great recipes, meditation and exercise tips that you might find helpful. Best of luck, and please let us know if there’s anything that we can do for you in the future.

    Thanks,

    Maren

  8. SHEILA

    1 year ago

    I HAVE READ ALL ABOUT THE STEM CELL THERAPY AND I WANT TO DO THIS MORE THAN ANYTHING IN THE WORLD. I AM 61 AND THEY DIAGNOSED ME AT 32. IT SEEMS TO GET WORSE AS I GET OLDER. MY PROBLEMS IS THERE IS NO WAY I CAN COME UP WITH THE MONEY TO HAVE IT DONE. DO YOU KNOW OF SOME DOCTOR THAT IS GIVING A TRIAL TEST OR SOME DOCTOR THAT IS WILLING TO TRY IT? DO YOU KNOW WHEN INSURANCE MAY START COVERING THIS? TO ME IT WOULD BE TO THEIR BENEFIT. PLEASE HELP ME IF YOU CAN. AFTER 30 YRS. I AM SO READY FOR RELIEF. THANKS

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

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