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How to Implement a Walking Program

17 Jul 2015
| Under Uncategorized | Posted by | 1 Comment
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 How to Implement a Walking Program

Oftentimes, shortness of breath limits the everyday activities of individuals dealing with a debilitating lung condition like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This issue can take away from the enjoyment of physical activity for those that have been diagnosed. Thankfully, there is another physical activity that can help sufferers get back into exercise world: walking. Learn how to implement a walking program and why it matters here.

The Benefits of Walking

Although walking may seem as if it is not aiding the body as much as going for a jog or a hike, it has more health benefits than people think. Dr. Chris Palkowski, physician-in-chief of Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center and an occasional walk leader, said a 30-minute walk five days a week is proven to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control blood sugar and raise the metabolic rate. In edition, performing physical activity helps to maintain balance, which is extremely important. The elderly have a higher risk of falls, so lowering that risk factor by walking on a flat surface is important.

The gym can be an intimidating place for most, especially those that have to live with a lung disease. Also, going for a walk outside can be a challenge due to humidity, and the intense heat in some places, which can cause a flare-up. The purpose of these indoor walking programs is to provide people with a comfortable atmosphere to move around in. Mall programs were started to give people the opportunity to exercise in a cooled atmosphere that is very low key.

Mall Walking Programs

Mall walking is on the rise as it becomes a daily routine in many people’s lives, mainly individuals ages 55 and up. Malls across the country are hosting walking programs for people of all ages and health conditions to join. Although each program may be a little different based on the location, most malls open two hours prior to normal shopping hours to let people come in and get exercise.

The Pep In The Step

Joyfully, most people that join mall walking programs find it to be more than just exercise. Many people see it as a fun social event as they meet people along their morning route. In many cases, walkers become friends and supporters for each other. Creating a healthy and active social life is essential to everyone—especially those with lung disease. After morning walks, many will gather together and enjoy breakfast within the mall. These bonds help build a healthy incentive to motivate people to keep showing up and sustaining great health.

How do You Get Involved?

If you believe that mall walking is an activity you would like to pursue, it is very easy to join. You can either call malls within your area or search online by clicking on their entertainment tab located on their website.

The Lung Institute understands the difficulty of getting out of the house and adding healthy and safe activity to your daily life when dealing with lung disease. If you or a loved one suffers from a lung disease like COPD, then please contact us at (800) 729-3065 to speak with a patient coordinator that can assist you in taking the right steps.


1 Comment

  1. Mary Nell Eaton

    1 year ago

    I am scheduled to have Venous treatment on August tenth- August fourteenth . At this time , I could not possibly walk for thirty minutes, but hopefully I can after I get my treatment.

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