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Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis

6 Oct 2014
| Under Chronic Bronchitis, Treatments | Posted by | 35 Comments
Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis

Marijuana use can be a controversial topic. Let’s confront it head-on.

For those who suffer from Chronic Bronchitis, maintaining one’s quality of life can be a difficult struggle. As a form of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) chronic bronchitis describes a set of symptoms that may or may not be present in COPD such as chronic cough, wheezing, mucus production, and fatigue. However, recent legal and medical advances have established medical marijuana as an emerging form of treatment for a variety of ailments including lung disease.

With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to explore the relationship between Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis and see just how this emerging form of treatment can be used to combat the disease.

Smoking Marijuana

Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis

When marijuana is traditionally consumed through smoking, spreading at least 33 known carcinogens, 300 additional chemicals, and deposits 4 times as much tar into the lungs as cigarette smoke. Due to the method in which marijuana is smoked–typically deeper than cigarettes with a tendency to hold the smoke in the lungs longer– these variations only contribute to making the inherent negative effects of smoking worse.

Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis 

Due to the mixed legality of medical marijuana, there are few studies available showing or disproving the effectiveness of medical marijuana as a form of treatment. As the topic of medical marijuana is explored further as a form of treatment for lung disease, the question remains: how does marijuana affect someone who struggles with chronic bronchitis? Some tests indicate the positive effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on opening the airways, while others point to negative outcomes from marijuana smoke inhalation.

Chronic bronchitis flare-ups can occur whether instigated or not.  Adding smoke of any kind can cause symptoms of chronic bronchitis to become severe, especially coughing, sputum (phlegm), wheezing and shortness of breath. Although studies have shown that a low rate of marijuana use (1-2 joints a month) can be beneficial for those with chronic lung disease, while habitual marijuana use (25 joints a month) can weaken immunostimulatory cytokines and in turn, weaken the immune system. Smoking marijuana, coupled with chronic bronchitis, can lead to a higher probability of developing a lung infection as well.

THC and Chronic Bronchitis 

Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis

There have been some conflicting studies that have produced results that THC, the main psychoactive component of marijuana, is actually good for your lungs. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has approved THC as a drug, which means that THC’s benefits outweigh its risks. Studies have also shown that THC can act as a bronchodilator, increasing airflow to the lungs. In turn, this could increase lung functioning and efficiency. However, although THC is an approved drug and has some beneficial attributes to lung disease symptoms, consuming THC products does not necessarily constitute a safe form of treatment for people diagnosed with chronic bronchitis.

Although the use of medical marijuana can serve as a temporary method of treatment, the inability to avoid the side effects (being ‘high’) and its mixed legality leaves its use as a future form of medication uncertain. Although COPD currently has no cure, new discoveries are being made every day in the field of stem cell research. As the scientific community continues to put their best minds to the task of solving the problems and complications of the human body, the Lung Institute will continue to bring these advancements to the public with the hope of bettering quality of life for those who need it most.

The Lung Institute has helped hundreds of people seeking an alternative treatment for COPD by using the stem cells in their own body to promote healing. If you’re looking to make a profound change in your life or the life of someone you love, the time is now. If you or a loved one suffers from COPD, or another lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of stem cell treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 today to find out if you qualify for stem cell therapy.

Suffering from Chronic Bronchitis and considering medical marijuana? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts and comments on Marijuana Use and Chronic Bronchitis below.

35 Comments

  1. Phoebe

    1 month ago

    Hello Ms. Toker,

    Anytime people inhale smoke or hot vapor of any kind, it may cause damage to the lungs. While there are studies about both the positive and negative effects of marijuana, smoking of any kind has the potential to damage the lungs. For places that have legalized medical marijuana, the doctors prescribing it often direct their patients to use the edible form or a pill form of marijuana, so their patients can avoid the potential harmful effects of inhaling smoke. We recommend people talk with their doctors before trying marijuana or any other forms of treatment.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Ms. Toker

    1 month ago

    I Smoke every single day and I have never had an issue with my breathing or anything. I don’t believe this article at all. there is no proof at all that weed causes anything like what they are stating. a ton of studies that are related to the use of marijuana where put out into the public just a few days ago proving that the chemicals inside weed actually reverse the effects of any smoke damage and that long-term actually improves memory function and that’s just the beginning. there are nothing but positive things from weed. that’s why it’s finally being legalized, Canada is next (july, 1, 2018)

  3. Josh

    3 months ago

    I have smoked marijuana daily for two years. I am a very heavy user. I smoke more than a gram per day some days. I have BEEN SUFFERING FROM ACUTE BRONchitis for more than a week now, and it only began to get better when i would stop smoking the marijuana. I believe perhaps the smoking action and the oils coating the lungs did not sit well with the rest of the scenario. It would seem i gained the benefit of opened airways and some pain relief from either the high or perhaps some cannabinoid that aids in anti-inflammation and pain relief. However i would like to offer my experiences that perhaps the benefits of smoking marijuana during bronchitis do not outweigh the discomforts. I DON’T know why my phone is typing everything in capital letters. I apologize in advance.

  4. Matt

    4 months ago

    Hello Roy,
    Thank you for your post. If you are having constant complications, then we advise you contact your primary care physician and discuss your concerns. They’re more likely to be familiar with your medical background and can give you a more informed answer. Thanks again and have a great day.

  5. Roy

    4 months ago

    a 63 y/o with DX of mild asthma and get acute bronchitis every year. I have chronic allergies and take Zyrtec and singular and use Flonase and Flovent daily. I smoke 1-2-3 puffs of pot daily. I DO NOT SMOKE IT WHEN SICK. I used to smoke cigs 30 years ago, 1/2 pack a day. I’m really fine most of the time and run 9 miles a week and very active. I have been smoking pot for about 3 years now. I am wondering if smoking this small amount of pot can be causing my “colds” to always end up as bronchitis/sinusitis. Any thoughts? Oh yes, I was getting bronchitis almost annually also when I was NOT smoking pot.

  6. Deshun simons

    5 months ago

    I have used Marijuana for over 20 years. When I had asthma I smoked every other day n didn’t have a single attack for at least 8 years but picked up the dirty habit of cigarettes. When I stop smoking weed for a few months (still smoking cigarettes ) I developed chronic bronchitis. I started smoking weed more but still added cigarettes to the equation. I didn’t really have too many attacks until this one day I was smoking a cigarette I thought I was going to die coughing n short of breath n in soo much pain. On my way hospital my mom stopped me n told me take some of this oil hash oil . I swallowed this and almost instantly my coughing n pain in my chest was soothed. From that day forward I stopped smoking cigarettes. I still use Marijuana from time to time n it’s only when I’m exposed to the cigarette smoke i have a bronchitis attack!

  7. M R

    5 months ago

    Hello Yash,
    Thank you for your question. We recommend you discuss this with your primary healthcare provider. They will be better informed on what works best for you. Thanks again and have a great day.

  8. yash

    5 months ago

    Hi I m Yash and I m suffering from bronchitis and m not able to gain weight and m 18 years old and my weight is 40 kg and I some times smoke also for curing cough what should I do to gain weight please help me

  9. Sharman joshi

    5 months ago

    Thank you for your reply.
    But i cannot reveal my smoking issue in front of my parents …. so i seek a response from experts like you .
    Thanks again for the spontaneous reply and i look forward for the same .
    Regards

  10. Matt Reinstetle

    5 months ago

    Hello Sharman, Thank you for your question.
    There are two types of bronchitis – acute and chronic. Acute bronchitis can last a few weeks and go away, while chronic is constant. It sounds like you may be prone to acute bronchitis, but we’d recommend you talk with your primary physician and discuss your concerns. They should know your medical history in better detail and can give you a more informed diagnosis. Thanks again and have a great day.

  11. sharman joshi

    5 months ago

    Hi,
    i have a problem that i want to discuss. i am not an addict to smoking(ciggrates not marijuana) but i need 2 of them in one month. During the winter season i tend to develop tonsilitis followed by bronchitis which takes almost 4-5 weeks to settle. This happens every year and i am worried as my family has a hereditary problems related to the respiratory system. But at the same time i feel smoking atmost 2 ciggrates a month won’t cause any harm to my condition.All i want is an expert advise on my case and some measures to help myself.Please help me.
    Thank you
    Regards

  12. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Mary,

    Thanks for your comment. First and foremost, we’re sorry to hear about the challenges your mom is facing with COPD. Both smoking and inhaling second-hand smoke are lung irritants and may worsen COPD symptoms. We recommend talking with your mom’s doctor and asking for his or her advice. Your mom’s doctor knows her and her health conditions well, so your mom’s doctor will be able to best guide you. We wish you and your mom the best.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  13. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Collette,

    Thanks for your comment. Smoking is a lung irritant, even if someone doesn’t smoke often. We recommend talking with your doctor about the potential benefits and risks of using marijuana. Because your doctor knows you and your health situation well, he or she will be able to answer your questions and best guide you. Your doctor may also have recommendations about what you can do to breathe easier. We wish you the best.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  14. Collette

    5 months ago

    Based upon research I had done in the past, I was of the understanding that Marijuana is a “Bronchodilator.” I am not a regular smoker of it, but I keep a small bit stored away in the event I contract a cold and subsequent lung infection; which happens every time I get a cold. The last cold I had was a bad one, and at the peak of the infection, I can’t say it was hard to breathe, but remembering my research, I smoked just one puff of marijuana and after a few minutes, I did feel as though my lungs opened up. That said, I do believe that it served as a therapeutic effect for
    me … and I conjecture it was therapeutic precisely because I utilized it as such. (I do not smoke cigarettes) Although it makes sense that smoke of any kind going into the lungs is not a good thing – where I come out on it is this: the benefit of the one single puff of smoke outweighed the risk of any damage it may cause because, it definitely opened up my lungs and I could breathe better. I am presuming that the potential damage would be negligible, that one puff might cause; a couple times a year (if that); no?

  15. Mary

    5 months ago

    Mom is 87 and has copd after smoking cigarettes for many years. She is on oxygen 24/7. My brother lives with her and vapes daily. He also smokes marijuana and does dabs – several times daily. He also still also smokes cigarettes occasionally. He denies this and mom doesn’t believe us. I have no sense of smell and mom has lost hers. My daughter says the house reeks from his activities. How bad is he hurting her?

  16. PB

    6 months ago

    Dear Vivian,

    Thanks for your comment and questions. Like you, many people with bronchitis are prescribed antibiotics and bronchodilators by their doctors to help them breathe easier. It’s important to keep in mind that smoking in any form comes with its risks and can cause lung problems. This includes smoking and vaping. You can read more about the dangers of smoking by clicking here and about the dangers of vaping by clicking here. Talk with your doctor about tips and techniques to help keep you smoke-free, and remember to see your doctor regularly, especially if you notice a change in your lung health or overall health. We hope this information is helpful for you, and we wish you the best.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  17. Vivian

    6 months ago

    I’m 17 and just got diagnosed with bronchitis. Ever since I was diagnosed I stopped vaping (E Liquids) and I stopped smoking weed or tobacco out of a bong. My doctor prescribed me to antibiotics and I got a bronchodiliator inhaler thing. So ever since I was diagnosed, I’ve been getting better but I do want to find out whether smoking weed out of a bong would make it better or worse?? Smoking tobacco out of a bong??? and Vaping E Liquids ???

  18. Steve

    7 months ago

    Actually trying now. Was worried that smoking was causing the bronchitis. Stopped a week. Bronchitis slowly getting better. Just smoked. Seems to relax the breathing. Also ate an lozenge. Saw old ad for cannabis cough syrup. Michael safer than codine.

  19. PB

    9 months ago

    Dear Sophie,

    If you’re interested in learning more about stem cell treatment options for chronic lung disease, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. Our patient coordinators have a wealth of knowledge about stem cells, treatment, candidacy and cost. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  20. Sophie Nesbitt

    9 months ago

    Hi- I stopped cigarette smoking after 4o years, in May this year. Went in hospital for operation on my leg. Woke up in intensive care. Took me hours to come round & had a lung infection.
    After a lot of chest thumping & oxygen & ventilators, I was able to breathe properly for the first time in years. My doc says I had early emphasymia. Will see him again soon –
    I smoke cannabis with organic tobacco. I also take oil daily & use a Vape pen too. Would be interested in getting more info from you. Thank you.

  21. PB

    9 months ago

    Dear Mary,

    Thanks for your comment. Quitting smoking is important to better lung health. For tips on quitting smoking, click here. Your doctor is a great resource, and he or she will likely have suggestions to help you. We recommend discussing and developing a treatment plan with your doctor.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  22. Mary Jane

    9 months ago

    I’m a heavy MJ user more than 10 yrs daily use. I also had severe childhood asthma now I have bronchitis and have been having really bad mucous build up and shortness of breath with a tight chest. I have gotten to where I CANT smoke and I wish I could. Thinking abt vaping but have also read about it causing worse symptoms for some as smoking. I guess the best thing is to quit altogether but MJ helps me with depression and relaxes me I don’t want to take any prescription drugs

  23. Frances Murphy

    12 months ago

    Hi i have Emphysema for over 36 years & i must have tried every inhaler & meds there is can you tell me if cannabis oil or paste will help please

  24. Maverick

    12 months ago

    I was diagnosed with copd at 12 I would lay in bed for months because of how crippling it was on my day to day actions, now im 15 I starting smoking marijuana medicinally at around 14 it helps treat my depression, anxiety, and my copd. I used to stay in bed for months now I dont even stay in bed for days it truly has changed my life even the medication that they’d used give me couldnt stand up nearly to the standards that cannabis now sets out for me. And yes everyone smoking anything has negative effects on your health thats why I use a vaporizer or a ice bong.

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  26. Jason

    1 year ago

    I am a medical marijuana patient and I use it for ptsd, anxiety, and other reasons. I had bronchitis that developed into pneumonia I did not use marijuana when I was diagnosed with bronchitis however I smoked when I had pneumonia and smoking helped me clear my lungs. Not to mention I believe some of this article is not true. Let me ask everyone a question. Why does it state that marijuana is dangerous to health when it has been medically and scientific my proven the marijuan does not harm your lungs or your body unless you have an allergy to it.

  27. Pingback: Marijuana Laws Are Harmful – cannabiscloset

  28. ken

    1 year ago

    I’ve suffered from chronic bronchitis since I was ten, I’ve been smoking weed regularly since I was 17 (now 23) and I have had significantly less attacks over the last few years. I used to have 2-4 horrible month long sessions of coughing a year till I would pass out or puke when I was younger, now it can be once a year or not even happen. I may have grown out of the coughing slightly or it could be the weed helping… I’m not a scientist ;p

  29. oregon

    2 years ago

    Please correct “cells found in proteins”.

  30. rmsadmin

    2 years ago

    Thank you Chuck but everything is ok on our end. What browser are you using?

  31. Chuck

    2 years ago

    Your pictures on your website are coming up. Thought you’d want to know.

  32. Perry Bird

    2 years ago

    I use a vaporizer, it burns oil works great as a broncho dilator, as long as I use it sparingly. heavy use does seem to expand my lungs too much, and is counter productive.

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  34. adriel

    2 years ago

    Yeah I wonder if thc effects the lungs without direct contact

  35. carl

    2 years ago

    Would eating thc in the edible form have any positive or negative affect for bronchitis? It isn’t inhaled so it wouldn’t even touch the lungs.

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