Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Mental Stimulation with Lung Disease

29 Sep 2015
| Under Lifestyle | Posted by | 1 Comment
mental stimulation with lung disease

Mental Stimulation with Lung Disease

For someone suffering from lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, daily activities become a challenge. Physical activities that used to be effortless, now leave lung disease sufferers feeling helpless. Just because someone is suffering from lung disease doesn’t mean their only option for entertainment is watching daytime TV. Keeping the brain occupied with mentally stimulating activities can improve memory, mood and self-esteem.

  • Cooking

Cooking can be an enjoyable activity for those looking to try new things and spark creativity. There are numerous recipes online with step-by-step directions included. Once a recipe is mastered, try putting a personalized spin on it. If COPD or another form of lung disease makes it difficult for you to stand for longer periods of time, please see our list of quick recipes for COPD sufferers. Cooking from home or in a cooking class uses your senses: sight, smell, taste, and touch, which involves different parts of the brain.

  • Meditation

Sit back and take a deep calming breath. Meditation is a form of stress reduction where one trains the mind to self-regulate. According to a CBC News report, meditation enhances brain function. The study found that people who practiced 11 hours of meditation a month, less than 30 minutes a day, saw improved mood changes and lower levels of anxiety, depression, anger and fatigue. Participating in daily mediation can improve your sleep patterns, manage your breathing and increase energy levels.

  • Puzzles

Puzzles can be a great for those with lung disease because it’s not a physically demanding hobby. At the same time, they can be a mentally stimulating way to fight off age-related illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Stay mentally active by working on crosswords, jigsaw puzzles, and Sudoku.

  • Reading

Reading is a great way to stay sharp mentally and reduce the rate of cognitive decline. According to a 2013 study conducted by Rush University Medical Centre in Chicago, people age 55 and older who read books, wrote or participated in mental activities linked to memory stimulation, saw an estimated 15 percent slower decline in cognitive ability. If you are having trouble holding a book, consider investing in an e-reader, which digitally gives you thousands of titles at the push of a button. Reading also serve as an escape from everyday life.

While lung diseases can affect the daily life of those diagnosed, it doesn’t mean you have to give up the things you love. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a lung disease and are interested in learning about cell therapy treatment options, please contact us at the Lung Institute to learn more or call (800) 729-3065.

1 Comment

  1. Sofie

    1 year ago

    To this list one could add Qi Gong or Tai Chi exercises, which are very low impact on the body, can be done seated or laying down, enhance the breathing capabilities and stimulate the brain.

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