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The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Obstructive and Restrictive Lung Diseases

Obstructive and Restrictive Lung Diseases

Are you baffled by the idea that you now have a lung disease and the various treatment options? Well don’t be too surprised! Lung diseases are common and are treated differently depending upon the nature of your particular condition. Most doctors classify lung diseases as either obstructive or restrictive. While this may seem like a relatively simple way of keeping track of diseases, there are several key differences between each classification. To better understand your lung disease, let’s take a closer look at both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases.

Obstructive Lung Diseases

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Obstructive lung diseases include conditions that make it hard to exhale all the air in the lungs. The damage to the lungs or the narrowing of the airways inside the lungs, causes air to come out a lot more slowly than normal. Usually, by the end of every breath, a lot of air remains in the lungs. Here are some of the most common conditions related to obstructive lung diseases:

Obstructive lung disease makes it harder to breathe, especially during increased activity or exertion. As the rate of breathing increases, there is less time to breathe all the air out before the next inhalation. This distinguishes obstructive lung disease from restrictive forms of the disease.

Restrictive Lung Diseases

People with a restrictive lung disease have a much more difficult time filling their lungs with air. This is a result of the lungs being restricted from fully expanding. Most of the time, restrictive lung diseases occur when there is stiffness in the lungs themselves. Sometimes, this can occur when there is stiffness in the chest wall, weak muscles or damaged nerves that can restrict the expansion of the lungs. These are some of the conditions classified as restrictive lung disease:

Almost all lung diseases are tested by using a pulmonary function test. Obstructive and restrictive lung diseases can cause shortness of breath, severe coughing and chest pain. Treatments are different for each condition and will require a special treatment plan provided by your doctor. If you have been diagnosed or suspect that you might have a lung disease, you should talk to your doctor about your condition immediately. Be sure to ask the right questions and do some research on your lung disease.

Though the process of researching a potential lung disease can be stressful, remember you have options. The Lung Institute offers a variety of stem cell therapy options as a treatment for lung disease. If you or a loved one have lung disease and would like to know more, please contact us or call (800) 729-3065 to find out more information.

18 Comments

  1. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Robin,

    Thanks for your comment. Recently, we wrote some articles about lung transplant procedures, and you can read one of the articles by clicking here. Remember that it’s important to discuss all of your questions and concerns with your doctor. We’re happy to answer any questions you have regarding stem cell therapy, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Robin

    2 months ago

    I thank you for all your patience and information,it helps Great deal,I’m very interested in the stem cell research and outcome.I have severe COPD my Doctor has suggested lung transplant for our next step,I’m not reall comfortable with that,I
    Don’t know if my health would permit success.Any info: would be greatly appreciated.

  3. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Charlie,

    First and foremost, thank you for your service to our country. We have treated veterans who have COPD, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, pulmonary fibrosis and other chronic lung diseases. You can watch some of our patients’ stories by clicking here. We are happy to answer your questions about stem cell treatment, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  4. charlie

    2 months ago

    Being a 100% dis abled vet, I was over sprayed with Agent Orange several times. Lungs are shot, they say. I understand you can’t make any opinions without seeing my history. HAS YOUR SYSTEM HELPED ANYONE WITH SIMILAR PROBLEMS?? Thanks, Charlie

  5. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Prakash,

    First and foremost, we’re sorry to hear of the challenges your wife has been experiencing with IPF. In order to speak with one of our patients, you’ll first need to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. They can answer your questions, discuss options and put you in touch with a patient who has received treatment. We’re happy to answer any questions you have regarding stem cell therapy, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  6. Prakash

    2 months ago

    Stem Cell Technology seems to be very promising .
    Can you give the names of the patient and address so that one can utise their experience.

    My wife is suffering from IPF for last 10 years. She is given Ayurvedic Treatment , Physiotherapy and Naturopathy Treatment to control growth of the disease.

    Thanks
    P.J.LAKHAPATE

  7. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Omkari,

    Thank you for your question. Stem cell treatment is an option for someone with sarcoidosis. To answer your question and to discuss candidacy, it’s best to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. So, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to speaking with you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  8. Omkari

    5 months ago

    Is stem cell transplant an option for someone with aggressive sarcoidosis with secondary pulmonary hypertension?

  9. PB

    7 months ago

    Dear Mary,

    We’re so sorry to hear that you and your mother went through such a difficult time. We offer you our deepest sympathies. Thank you for sharing some of your story with us, and we wish you the best.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  10. Mary Smith

    7 months ago

    My mother suffered from chronic restricted lung disease and at the age of 91
    was offered NO treatment plan. She suffered each and every day for each breath until
    her death in 2012 at the age pf 94 I watched and questioned every day if there was something else I could have done tp relieve her suffering. I carry the guilt each day – that I could’t find an answer. I pray, that doctor’s will become more compassionate to their patient’s needs – regardless of age.

  11. PB

    10 months ago

    Dear Vicky,

    Because restrictive lung diseases affect everyone differently, it’s important to speak with your doctor about your symptoms, questions, and concerns. If you would like more information about possible stem cell treatment options at the Lung Institute, please feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with one of our patient coordinators.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  12. Vicky R Montiel

    10 months ago

    Hi i just had a pulmonary lung test and found that i have restrictive lungs what can i do to reverse this my husband steve had it done

  13. PB

    10 months ago

    Hi Crusta,

    We’re sorry to hear that you’re having trouble breathing. The best way to answer your question is to speak with your doctor. Because your doctor knows you and your situation, he or she would know how to help you. One tip is to write your questions and concerns down ahead of time so that when you see your doctor, you can discuss them with him or her.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  14. Crusta

    10 months ago

    Hello. I have problems in breathe. I cnt breath normally at night. I need to put a lot of pressure for breathing. Pft test says i have restrictive asthama. What should i do? I hv a background of tuberculosis

  15. Cameron Kennerly

    10 months ago

    Hello Judy,

    Thanks for your comment! However given the specificity of your question, we’d recommend speaking to one our patient coordinators at (855) 313-1149. Their wealth of knowledge should be helpful in answering any questions you have regarding your husband.

    Looking forward to hearing from you Judy,

    -The Lung Institute

  16. Judy Connelly

    10 months ago

    My husband was just diagnosed with obstructive and restrictive lung disease. He has no symptoms but his primary care doctor wanted him to be tested. He is 70. Doctor said the bottom of his lungs seem to be a little collapsed. He has never had pneumonia or bronchitis. Could this be congenital? Could it be because his mother smoked while pregnant. What should we expect to happen in the next 10 years? Thanks for your help.

  17. Cameron Kennerly

    11 months ago

    Hello Ann,

    Although we aren’t familiar with your daughters genetic disease, we tried generic search using the keywords “genetic small lungs” and found this. Although unfamiliar with your daughter’s condition, perhaps one of these links can shed some light. Hope this helps.

    Happy Holidays and Thanks for Your Question,

    -The Lung Institute

  18. Ann

    11 months ago

    My daughter has a rare genetic disease and was just checked for her lungs because she gets so out of breath fast right after starting movement. So her blow tests were very low and she doesn’t have asthma. He said he thinks she was born with small lungs. I have tried to look up info but can’t find any. What would I enter it in the search engine?

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

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