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Product Review: My Spirometer

5 Oct 2016
| Under Product Reviews, Resources | Posted by | 6 Comments
Product Review: My Spirometer

A new innovation to measuring your pulmonary function.

For those who suffer from chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), managing one’s health and symptoms are among the most important lifestyle choices one can make. Under these conditions, although diet, exercise and treatment are critical to this process, what is equally important (and often overlooked) is the need to check vitals consistently—namely the measurement of pulmonary function.

Among the most important tests of pulmonary function, measurements such as FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FEVC, and FEFmax can be the most determinative in gauging one’s pulmonary health. Luckily, among the various spirometers available on the market, there’s a product that measures all four. And its name is the My Spirometer.

With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to break down the My Spirometer, and explain how it may just change the way we measure our pulmonary function moving forward.

What Does a Spirometer Do?

Product Review: My Spirometer

Simply put, a spirometer is used to measure a patient’s pulmonary function and provide a metric or readout of that patient’s results. Although there are standard models of these devices that involve blowing air into a plastic tube for an extended period of time, modern devices such as the My Spirometer are electronically based, meaning they can provide more accurate recordings of a patient’s airflow and pulmonary function.

The metrics collected from a typical spirometer can be broken down as such:

  • FEV1Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1), this is the amount of air that can be forcibly blown in one second in a full breath.
  • FVCForced Vital Capacity (FVC), this is a measurement of the volume of air that can be forcibly blown in a full breath.
  • FEV1/FVCCombining both the FEV1 and FVC this percentage is used to compare to the average pulmonary health of a human adult. This is used for staging in many diagnoses of chronic lung disease.
  • FEFmaxForced Expiratory Flow (FEF) is the speed of air coming out of the lung during the middle of the forced expiration.

Where the My Spirometer Comes in

As we’ve mentioned before, it’s important to not only have accurate measurements of your pulmonary function but also to understand them. This information can be a guide to lifestyle adjustments such as diet and exercise, as well as a guideline to a patient’s natural decline. The My Spirometer was designed for Asthma & COPD in order to provide a source of accurate pulmonary function measurements.

Moving Forward…

It’s important to test your pulmonary function often so you can stay informed on your health. Although COPD can seem insurmountable, the first step to living a longer life is finding a treatment that addresses the disease head-on. Changing one’s diet and consistently exercising are among the best lifestyle changes one can do aside from quitting smoking. However, if you’re looking to address COPD progression directly, it may be time to consider stem cell therapy. Rather than only addressing the symptoms of lung disease, stem cell therapy directly affects disease progression and can improve quality of life and pulmonary function. For people with lung disease, a change in quality of life could mean the difference between struggling to walk to the mailbox and riding a bike.

If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic disease like ILD, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis or other symptoms of lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of adult stem cell treatment options. Contact us today at (800) 729-3065 to see if you qualify for stem cell therapy, and find out what stem cell therapy could mean for you.

Interested in our Product Review: My Spirometer…Share your thoughts and comments below.

6 Comments

  1. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Theresa,

    First and foremost, we’re sorry to hear about the challenges your mother has been facing with occupational lung disease and cancer. Unfortunately, at this time, insurance companies and Medicare don’t cover treatment. However, we’re hopeful that treatment will be covered by insurance companies and Medicare in the near future. Keep in mind that it will take some time before the insurance companies see a financial benefit in their favor and then decide to cover it. If you and your mother would like to learn more about stem cell treatment options, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. Our patient coordinators have a wealth of knowledge about stem cells, treatment, cost and candidacy, and we’re happy to answer your questions. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  2. Theresa moore

    2 months ago

    My mother Judy Moore has cold she worked in a factory for years with chemicals called (mek) and other chemicals to make kitchen cabinets for houses and she has tried every type of solutions to treat her lungs she is a two time cancer survivor which I am very thankful for and so is she so seeing this caught my eye and I believe itll help my mother regardless of her age she is 67 years old and a very strong active person but,her lungs stop her from living her life as she did before getting diagnost with cold and having cancer she did have radiation so that has a part to do with her lung too.My opinion it should be covered by medicare cause she worked hard her whole life to live the.life she has now and she can’t even enjoy it cause she can’t go anywhere without getting out of breath she’s a tiny woman too she isn’t over weight or anything.

  3. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Michael,

    Unfortunately, at this time, insurance companies and Medicare don’t cover treatment. However, we’re hopeful that treatment will be covered by insurance companies and Medicare in the near future. Keep in mind that it will take some time before the insurance companies see a financial benefit in their favor and then decide to cover it. Treatment cost varies depending on treatment type, so it’s best to speak with a patient coordinator. In the meantime, you can learn more about stem cell treatment options and have your questions answered by one of our patient coordinators. Feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 for more information. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  4. michael

    2 months ago

    How much does this stem cell procedure cost and do you except medicare?

  5. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Barbara,

    Thanks for your comment and questions. If you’re interested in learning more about the product featured in the review, then click here to read more about My Spirometer. If you’re interested in learning more about stem cell treatment for chronic lung diseases, then feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. Treatment cost varies depending on treatment type. We’re happy to answer your questions regarding stem cell treatment options, and our patient coordinators have a wealth of knowledge about stem cells, treatment, candidacy and cost. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  6. Barbara

    2 months ago

    Where can I purchase and cost? Do you accept insurance? Thanks
    BARBARA MEEK

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

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