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Risks of Not Having Enough Oxygen

16 Mar 2016
| Under Disease Education, Lung Disease, Medical, Related Conditions | Posted by
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Risks of Not Having Enough Oxygen

The Risks of Not Having Enough Oxygen

When you have a chronic lung disease, having enough oxygen is always on your mind. The Risks of Not Having Enough Oxygen include suffering from the low-oxygen conditions hypoxemia or hypoxia. Without oxygen, the brain, liver, and other organs can begin to sustain damage mere minutes after symptoms start.

Hypoxemia (low oxygen in the blood) can cause hypoxia (low oxygen in body tissues) when the blood carries insufficient oxygen to the tissues to meet the body’s needs. The word hypoxia can be used to describe both either condition.

What are the symptoms of hypoxia?

Though symptoms of hypoxia vary in individual cases, the most common hypoxia symptoms include:

  • Changes in skin color, ranging from blue to bright red
  • Confusion
  • Coughing
  • Fast heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sweating
  • Wheezing

If you have hypoxia symptoms, call 911.

Treating Hypoxia

TreatingHypoxia

A person experiencing hypoxia should go to the hospital for treatment. Someone will need to keep track of the person’s oxygen level.

It is essential to get more oxygen into the body. Oxygen will be administered through a small plug in the nose or through a mask that covers both the nose and mouth. This is usually enough to bring a person’s oxygen level up to normal.

An inhaler can make breathing easier. If these tactics fail to help, the doctor might try administering medicine intravenously. Steroid drugs may also be necessary for a short time to reduce pulmonary inflammation.

When one’s life is in danger, and other treatments aren’t working, use of supplemental oxygen may be in order.

Causes of Hypoxia

 

Causes_of_Hypoxia

Preventing Hypoxia

Preventing_Hypoxia

The best way to prevent hypoxia is to stick with your treatment plan.

  • Take medicine every day, on schedule, to help prevent flare-ups and the need to use a rescue inhaler.
  • Eat a healthy diet, and be physically active.
  • Know your triggers, and avoid them.

Work with your doctor to develop an action plan for flare-ups. Know what to do when breathing trouble strikes.

Hypoxia occurs when there is a reduced amount of oxygen in body tissues. Hypoxemia presented in COPD is relatively easy to correct with relatively small amounts of supplemental oxygen. Cellular therapy may help promote healing and better lung function before the onset of severe problems such as hypoxia.

If you have a chronic lung condition, you may qualify for cellular therapy at the Lung Institute. Contact us online, or call one of our patient coordinators at 888-745-6697 to find out if you qualify.

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months of COPD patients.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.