Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Sleeping Positions with COPD

30 Jun 2015
| Under COPD, Lifestyle | Posted by | 5 Comments
Sleeping Positions with COPD

Find the Escape with COPD.

Do you ever wake up in the middle of the night struggling for breath? Does it ever feel like the agonizing pain will never go away?

Having a good night’s sleep is vital to maintaining good health. Without sufficient sleep, the body cannot begin to heal itself, which weakens the immune system. It also can lead to mood swings and affect your capability to maintain a healthy weight. Unfortunately, these issues are often shared among people with lung disease. When people with lung disease do not get an effective amount of sleep, it can cause their condition to worsen over time.

COPD Sleeping Disturbance

Sleep disturbance is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to the Confronting COPD International Survey about 40 percent of patients experience trouble sleeping. Having COPD is directly associated with oxygen desaturation, which results in impaired sleep quality, particularly during the end of REM sleep. This stage can last up to about an hour, and throughout this time both breathing and heart rate increase. Patients with COPD experience the most interruption during this period, causing intense hyperventilation.

Sleep Better With COPD

Luckily, there are a few small changes that those with COPD can make for easier breathing while sleeping. One of those small changes is adjusting your sleeping position. It is often said that the best way to keep the airways open is to avoid lying down, but rather sitting in an upright position. Although this method is extremely effective, it does not mean that is comfortable. Trying to sleep straight up can seem more like a hassle than an escape. Sleeping on your side is more of a comfortable alternative that avoids any tension in the throat, which can hinder breathing. Sleeping on your side opens up the airways and can tremendously decrease the risk of breathing problems.

Your head position is another factor that needs to be considered. When you are lying on your side, making sure that your head is propped in an upright position and not lying flat is key. When your head is completely flat, your airways are restricted which can cause hyperventilation. It is extremely important to pay attention to the amount of head support you use. Too many pillows can cause just as much tension as using no pillow at all. Using at least one to two pillows is best when trying to focus on maintaining an opening of the airways.


At the Lung Institute, we understand the difficultly of not just COPD itself, but the troubles of sleeping that come with it. If you or a loved one is suffering from a chronic lung disease like COPD, the Lung Institute might be able to help. Give the gift of a better quality of life through stem cell therapy at the Lung Institute. Contact one of our Patient Coordinators today by calling (800) 729-3065 for a free consultation.

 

 

5 Comments

  1. M R

    3 weeks ago

    Hello Rhonda,
    Thank you for your question. We recommend you discuss this with your primary healthcare provider. They’ll be able to give you more accurate information based on your medical history. If you have any questions related to so stem cell therapy, please give us a call at (855) 313-1149. Thanks again and have a great day.

  2. RHONDA DISHER

    3 weeks ago

    I HAVE COPD AND HAVE HAD PART OF MY LEFT LUNG TAKEN I FIND I FEEL REALLY BAD IN THE MORNINGS WHEN I STAND UP THATS WHEN I AM FIGHTING TO BREATH AND HAVE TO FIGHT A PANIC ATTACK ANY ADVICE WOULD HELP

  3. PB

    1 month ago

    Dear Ian,

    First and foremost, we’re sorry to hear about the challenges you have been facing with sleeping, fluid coming from behind your nose and coughing. It’s important to talk with your doctor about these symptoms and any other symptoms you are having. Because your doctor knows you and your health well, he or she will be able to best guide you. We wish you the best.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  4. Ian Mathias

    1 month ago

    I’m often woke up by a sudden rush of fluid coming from behind my nose, it’s not only blood. I’m also woke up with the taste of a 6month ashtray in my mouth and throat. It feels like I’ve been eating broken glass and can’t stop coughing all night this usually happens around 2am. Not both symptoms together. I packed in smoking in 1/16. I’ve been vaping since.

  5. Pingback: Lung Institute | Fighting COPD-Related Fatigue

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