Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Who to Watch at the Oscars

22 Feb 2015
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Oscars Lung Institute

The 87th Academy Awards are this evening, and there are plenty of great films and performers to keep an eye on. As with nearly every rendition of this famous awards gala, there will be no short supply of commentary about everything from the films and performances themselves to who wore what dress best. However, there is something far more pressing that many celebrities hope to promote while in front of the cameras that goes far beyond their own self-image, and that is the charitable organizations they represent.

Celebrities and their Charities

Tonight there are 5 male actors nominated for best actor in a starring role and there 5 females nominated for best actress in a starring role. Most of these performers have made it to the top rung of the film community before, however; a few are up and coming and making their first appearance. Nonetheless, each nominee has a long history of using their celebrity to help the less fortunate. Here is a list of each nominee and the charities they like to promote:

  • Steve Carell: This once Daily Show correspondent and The Office star is nominated for his role in When Carell is not using his talents to make us laugh or cry, he promotes the Alliance for Children’s Rights, a children’s advocacy group.
  • Bradley Cooper: Dazzling the world in the box office hit American Sniper, Cooper also plays a big role in supporting the Alzheimer’s Association and their work to better understand and treat this debilitating disease.
  • Benedict Cumberbatch: With his amazing performance as an analytical and socially awkward mathematician, Cumberbatch showed us in Imitation Game that focus and hard work can inevitably lead to greatness. Cumberbatch also works hard for the Elton John AIDS Foundation.
  • Michael Keaton: Odd is the best way to describe the movie Birdman, but in the best possible way. When Keaton is not making us scratch our heads and wonder about the human psyche, he supports educational opportunities and kids pursuing academic excellence.
  • Eddie Redmayne: This young actor wowed us with his representation of Stephen Hawking. On stage, he recently helped support homeless men and women throughout the United Kingdom by donating a hat for auction along with dozens of other actors and actresses.
  • Marion Cotillard: This French born actress has a long standing history of helping the environmental group Greenpeace. In 2005 she donated drawings to them for auction.
  • Rosamund Pike: A once Bond girl turned Gone Girl star supports the Barnardo’s Children’s Charity.
  • Reese Witherspoon: This actress is no newbie as it pertains to supporting charity organizations. Along with an Academy Award Nomination, she sits on the board for the Child Defense Fund.
  • Julianne Moore: Another veteran of supporting charitable endeavors, Moore has been a long supporter of gay rights and Planned Parenthood.
  • Felicity Jones: Playing opposite of Eddie Redmayne in the Theory of Everything, Felicity Jones supports JDRF, an organization that seeks to cure type 1 diabetes.

Not all of us will be able to promote the charities that we care about in front of millions of people. However, we can do more within our small space of the world. If you know someone that is suffering from a lung disease and they are looking for a way to breathe easier, be an advocate for them and look into stem cell treatments. The Lung Institute can help you along the journey to

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