February 2014

You know it’s coming as soon as you see the boxed chocolates and candy hearts hit the aisles at the supermarket – Valentine’s Day. Has your mind been wandering to a special someone lately? Do you feel as if your lung disease gets in the way of passion and romance? This month, we are taking a closer look at how lung disease affects relationships and providing some helpful tips to those having difficulty with intimacy. Read our blog Sex and COPD to learn more.

We’re also bringing you an amazing patient spotlight. Nashville resident Sherry Bauer recently returned to Lung Institute for her second stem cell treatment. We were able to sit down and discuss with Bauer how she has progressed, and how she’s feeling today. We hope you enjoy the interview below. Our patients inspire us each and every day.

Lastly, Lung Institute is a proud sponsor of the American Lung Association’s Fight for Air Climb 2014 taking place this March in downtown Tampa. Continue reading to see how you can get involved. Have you been treated at Lung Institute and would like to share your treatment story? We would love to feature you in our next edition. Contact us at info@lunginstitute.com

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, you may be thinking about that special someone a little more often and your mind might be wandering to the subjects of sex, love, and intimacy. Every relationship defines love a little differently. To one person, the act of showing meaningful affection might mean a night out on the town, and to another it might mean a quiet evening spent indoors and a playful wink from across the room. However you and your partner choose to show and feel love, embrace it.

Continue reading…

Sherry B., a Nashville, TN resident and Lung Institute patient, suffers from COPD. Recently, Sherry returned to Lung Institute for a second treatment, and we had the opportunity to sit down with her and discuss her progress since her first treatment and how she is feeling today.

“I have seen some small improvements. I am now able to sit and talk without oxygen for as long maybe as 3 hours…before, I could not. I can go to a movie and take (the mask) off my face. That to me was just awesome,” Bauer said.

“My recovery time is quicker. Before, say if I got up and did something without the oxygen, it would take me 20 to 25 minutes to recover. Now, I can recover in 5 minutes. That may not (matter) much to some people that aren’t aware of your situation, of what you go through every day, but it is good. To sit 5 minutes instead of 25 minutes is good to me.”

To read the full story, click here.

Lung Institute is a proud sponsor for the American Lung Association’s Fight for Air Climb 2014! This unique fundraiser is the 9th largest stair climb for the ALA, with over 1,000 participants and a fundraising goal of $222,000!

To learn how you can get involved, click here.

* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

Under current FDA guidelines and regulations 1271.10 and 1271.15, the Lung Institute complies with all necessary requirements for operation. Any individual who accesses Lung Institute's website for information is encouraged to speak with his or her primary physician for treatment suggestions and conclusive evidence. All information on this site should be used for educational and informational use only.