Stem Cell Therapy Pittsburgh

Occupational Lung Disease in Pittsburgh

The American Lung Association recently released their 2015 State of the Air report listing the cities with the cleanest and most polluted air. Unfortunately for Pittsburgh, the city once again ranked among those with the most polluted air in the nation. With the combination of the pollution in the air, the high prevalence of lung disease in the area and the local steel mills and coal mines, many people believe that occupational lung disease in Pittsburgh is on the rise. For those suffering from chronic lung disease, look out for the Lung Institute in Pittsburgh in July of 2015.

Occupational lung disease is a result of chronic respiratory infections caused by workplace hazards, such as breathing in sand and dust particles, harsh chemicals, small metal particles, and, in the case of black lung disease, coal dust. Occupational lung disease takes many years to develop, so often times symptoms don’t show up until the disease has already caused significant lung damage. Lung disease is expensive and many workers have to fight to get employers to cover costs. However, expensive medications, or, in more serious cases, a lung transplant, don’t have to be the only option. Minimally invasive stem cell therapy is now an effective treatment for lung disease.

Stem Cell Therapy

Many lung disease sufferers have opted in for stem cell therapy to improve their quality of life. While stem cell therapy isn’t a cure for lung disease, it has improved many patients’ quality of life. The Lung Institute uses stem cell therapy to improve lung function. Everyone has stem cells in their bodies that act as our body’s system to promote healing. Stem cell therapy specifically targets damaged areas and accelerates the healing process. The Lung Institute uses a minimally invasive procedure that extracts stem cells from the blood or bone marrow, and reintroduces them back into the body, targeting the damaged lung tissue. Stem cell therapy has significantly improved many patients’ lives by allowing them to breathe easier and do the things that they enjoy in life.

How it Works

Once the desired volume of stem cells are available, they are harvested from the patient’s own blood or bone marrow. The stem cells are then processed and returned to the patient intravenously or through the use of a nebulizer. Once the cells are returned to the patient, they will begin to promote healing. Since stem cells can continually replicate, there is the possibility that healing of the lungs can be promoted.


While stem cell therapy doesn’t cure lung disease, in most cases it significantly improves patients’ quality of life. Stem cell therapy has been used to treat various lung diseases, including COPD, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchietasis. Many Pittsburgh residents suffer from occupational lung disease, and the Lung Institute looks forward to provide an alternative treatment option for these residents.

If you or a loved one suffers from chronic lung disease, contact the Lung Institute to find out if stem cell therapy can help get your life back within reach. Contact us by calling (800) 729-3065 to see if you qualify.

* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

Under current FDA guidelines and regulations 1271.10 and 1271.15, the Lung Institute complies with all necessary requirements for operation. Any individual who accesses Lung Institute's website for information is encouraged to speak with his or her primary physician for treatment suggestions and conclusive evidence. All information on this site should be used for educational and informational use only.