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How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps

6 Jul 2016
| Under Medical, Related Conditions | Posted by | 21 Comments
How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps

Sometimes it’s best to just get it all out.

When dealing with a progressive lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema, the build-up of phlegm can be a constant source of frustration. Not only can this build-up cause difficulty in regular breathing, but the obstruction of the airways can be a source of aggravation, in the end causing more coughing. To avoid this, it’s important to clear the lungs as often as they become obstructed.

With your health in mind, the Lung Institute is here to show you how to do just that. Here’s How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps.

5. Drink Water

It may seem simple, but for 75% of Americans, chronic dehydration may be a constant issue. Your body needs water in order to function, but your throat in particular needs water to help clear mucus. By drinking two quarts of water a day, you can actively mitigate mucus build-up, allowing you to breathe better for longer periods of time. Aside from clearing out mucus, a glass of water a day has been found to improve moods, reduce headaches and improve energy levels. So for a healthier you, start your day with a glass of water.

4. Take an Expectorant or Mucolytic

An expectorant is a cough medication that works to loosen existing mucus within your lungs allowing your cough to be more productive. On the other hand, a mucolytic is a medicine that works to thin out mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up. Although this can be ordered by your doctor, you may be able to find a generic of this drug (such as Robitussin) over the counter. However, before trying any new medication, always consult your doctor.

3. Cough correctly

Although the idea of a correct way of coughing may seem strange, it’s important to remember that proper breathing can often come down to the effect of posture on the diaphragm. When coughing, it is best to sit up straight, bend forward slightly and avoid sitting and laying down when coughing whenever possible. As an added tip, it is best to use the “Huff Cough” technique, which entails doing several mini-coughs rather than one big cough.

How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps

2. Use Natural Remedies

Traditional medicine may not be everyone’s preference. It can come with specific side-effects or simply feel unnatural. For those who like to avoid traditional medication whenever possible, a variety of natural roots and herbs can be used to promote airway clearance and mucus reduction. These roots include:

  • Oregano
  • Orange peel
  • Elecampane
  • Eucalyptus peppermint
  • Lungwort
  • Osha Root
  • Chaparral and
  • Lobelia

So feel free to add these natural remedies to your diet after first consulting with your primary doctor or physician.

1. Use a Castor Oil Pack

Castor oil is a vegetable oil made from pressing the seeds of the castor oil plant. Available over the counter, castor oil is safe for consumption by the FDA and is known to help in a variety of health conditions. A castor oil pack—which can be made easily at home—works wonderfully in drawing toxins out of the body and has been appreciated as a general health tonic for centuries. When placed on the chest, similar to a vapor rub, castor oil is thought to break up congestion and toxins.

Although the habitual cleaning of one’s lungs is important to daily health and quality of life, if you’re looking to take a more proactive approach to your health, it may be time to consider stem cell therapy. If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic disease like COPD, emphysema, pneumoconiosis, or have other symptoms of lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of adult stem cell treatment options. Wondering how stem cell therapy works? Or where the Lung Institute is located? Contact us at (800) 729-3065 today for more info and to find out if you qualify for stem cell therapy.

Interested in How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps? Share your thoughts and comments below.

21 Comments

  1. Pingback: 5 Holistic COPD Treatment Options to Promote Healing – COPD

  2. PB

    2 months ago

    Dear Jan,

    Thanks for your comment. Because the treatments vary, the median time between treatments can also vary. In order to best answer your question, it’s good to speak with one of our patient coordinators, who can give you more detailed information about the treatments. Our patient coordinators can also discuss the best time for a patient to receive a booster treatment based on the factors that go into that decision. We’re happy to answer your questions, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  3. Jan H/

    2 months ago

    Thanks for the feedback but you didnt answer the question of how long the median time is between the first treatment and when (and if) a patient decides to opt for a booster. Surely you keep statistics. I’d like a direct answer. Thank you.

  4. PB

    3 months ago

    Dear Jan,

    Thanks for your questions. If a patient wants to have a booster treatment, then the patient would discuss that with his or her patient coordinator. Some people opt for more than one booster treatment, so they can continue their progress. Thank you for your suggestion about supplements. We’ll send this information along to our medical staff. We’re happy to answer your questions about stem cell treatment, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with a patient coordinator. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  5. Jan H/

    3 months ago

    Three questions:
    What is the median time a patient who has had one stem cell treatment goes before they feel ready to have a second?

    Do people ever opt for a third?

    Are you looking into post-treatment supplements that might be helpful in sustaining the effects of the treatments, such as HGH, nerve regenerative supplement, or any others?

  6. Pingback: 5 Holistic COPD Treatment Options to Promote Healing | Lung Institute

  7. Pingback: Staying Hydrated with COPD | Lung Institute

  8. PB

    4 months ago

    Dear Jerry,

    Thanks for your comment and for sharing your good news with us. We’re glad to hear that you’re seeing improvements. Please keep us updated on your progress, and feel free to contact your patient coordinator with any questions or updates.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  9. Jerry Lowe

    4 months ago

    I had the stem cell removal reinsertion treatment about two weeks ago and appear to have better lung oxygen intake/co2 exhaling. I definitely feel more energetic and am breathing easier.
    I hope the improvement continues and I will be up for playing golf again.

  10. PB

    4 months ago

    Dear Roy,

    Thanks for your comment. We have reached out to your patient coordinator, and your patient coordinator will be contacting you soon to discuss your questions further.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  11. PB

    4 months ago

    Dear Geri,

    First and foremost, we are sorry to hear that our staff has not followed-up with you or had ongoing communication. We have reached out to our team and let them know if this issue. Someone from our staff will contact you soon to discuss this issue further. Thank you for your feedback and for bringing us aware. Again, we apologize.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  12. RoyAldridge

    4 months ago

    I live in Texas and had my stem cell treatment over two years ago. I am due s booster. Has your pharmacy approved in Texas
    For sale of compounded Rx?

  13. PB

    4 months ago

    Dear Hanna,

    As with any medical procedure, unfortunately, treatment doesn’t improve symptoms for some people—though it’s a small percentage. We’re sorry to hear that treatment hasn’t improved your symptoms as much you had hoped. Similar to other therapies and medications, some treatments work well for some people and not as well for other people. It’s important to keep in close contact with your doctors about your symptoms, questions and concerns.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  14. Hanna

    4 months ago

    I had stem cell treatment in your Pa. Facility and have not had any improvement . very disappointing!

  15. Geri shippam

    4 months ago

    I had stem cell treatment last November at the lung institute in Phoenix. I was covert disPpointed it did not work but so far I do not have oxygen

    I was very disappointed I never heard from them again. It seemed they took my 10,ooo dollars and said sucker. I have no confidence in your treatment any more and would not advise any one to get it

    I am not saying this because it did not work but because you have no ongoing communication which I was looking forward to

  16. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear R. Heim,

    For some of our patients, oxygen therapy use has been reduced or no longer needed after their stem cell treatment. However, it’s important to continue to follow your current treatment plan before, during, and after stem cell treatment. It’s important to discuss coming off of oxygen and modifying your treatment plan with your doctor before changing your plan. Check out some of our patients’ stories by clicking here. We’re happy to answer any questions you have regarding stem cell therapy, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with a patient coordinator. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  17. R, Heim

    5 months ago

    if you have stem cell therapy will you be able to not have oxygen 24/7?

  18. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Shirley,

    Thanks for your question. Many patients begin to see results after three to six months from treatment. However, there are some patients who see results sooner. Because everyone is different, the amount of time the treatment lasts also varies from patient to patient. We are happy to answer your questions regarding stem cell treatment options, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with a patient coordinator. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  19. Shirley Allmon

    5 months ago

    How long will the treatment last?

  20. PB

    5 months ago

    Dear Cheryl,

    Thanks for your comment. We do operate under the guidelines of the FDA, but as of right now, the FDA doesn’t regulate a patient’s own cells. We’re hopeful that treatment will be covered by insurance companies in the near future, but it will take some time before the insurance companies see a financial benefit in their favor and then decide to cover it. However, you can learn more about stem cell treatment options and have your questions answered by one of our qualified patient coordinators. Feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 for more information. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  21. Cheryl Roberts

    5 months ago

    I would like to know at what phase are stem cell trials and when it may become FDA approved so insurance might cover the procedure.

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* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

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