Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

15 Jul 2016
| Under Lifestyle, Lung Disease, Oxygen Levels | Posted by | 23 Comments
Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Looking for a natural way to increase oxygen indoors?

For those suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the desire for more oxygen can be a demanding one. Although there are options available for increasing oxygen through means such as oxygenators and air purifiers, there are a variety of natural alternatives for increasing air quality that are beneficial for both body and mind. The Lung Institute believes the home should foster an environment of good health and well-being, and with your health in mind, we’ve compiled a list of the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen indoors.

5. Areca Palm

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

As with all plants, the Areca Palm is biologically engineered to take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen. However, what sets the Areca Palm apart is its ability to also purify the environment it’s placed in by removing dangerous chemicals such as formaldehyde, xylene and toluene.

Recommendation & Care:

The Areca Palm does well in filtered light and needs to be watered often. For one person, four shoulder high plants should suffice.

Best Placement:

The Living Room

 4. Snake Plant a.k.a. Mother-In-Law’s Tongue

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Considered highly efficient in oxygen production, the Snake Plant otherwise known as the Mother-In-Law’s Tongue, is unique for its nighttime oxygen production, and ability to purify air through the removal of benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene and toluene.

Recommendation & Care:

The Snake Plant does well in window light and needs to be watered weekly. For one person, six to eight waist level plants are recommended. In an air sealed room, these plants are capable of producing enough oxygen to breathe normally.

Best Placement:

The Bedroom

3. Money Plant

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Featured by NASA, the Money Plant is renowned for its ability to remove chemicals and other pollutants from the air, specifically benzene, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene. However, despite the benefit of its high purification rate, this plant is toxic to cats, dogs and small children if its leaves are ingested.

Recommendation & Care:

The Money Plant prefers indirect light and needs to be watered every week or so. For one person, three 18-inch plants are recommended.

Best Placement:

Any room but keep out of reach of pets or small children.

2. Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera Jamesonii)

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Arguably the prettiest entry on the list, the Gerbera Daisy is often used as a decorative element in gardening. However, the Gerbera Daisy is also distinct for its ability to produce high levels of oxygen at night while removing harmful chemicals, such as benzene and trichloroethylene. Beneficial for those suffering from sleep apnea and breathing disorders, keep this one on the nightstand for better sleep.

Recommendation & Care:

The Gerbera Daisy prefers bright sunlight during the summer, spring and fall, and indirect light during the winter. It needs to be watered regularly with the soil being kept moist. Due to the decorative nature of the flower, the amount of recommended flower pots is up to the discretion of the planter.

Best Placement:

The Bedroom

1. Chinese Evergreens

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

The Chinese Evergreen is one of the most common household plants and for good reason. This plant emits a high oxygen content while purifying indoor spaces of harmful chemicals such as benzene, formaldehyde and other toxins. As its name suggests, it is quite popular in China specifically for its high efficiency in removing harmful pollutants from the air.

Recommendation & Care:

The Chinese Evergreen does well in full shade, and only needs to be watered occasionally with a focus on keeping the soil moist. The number of plants kept is at the owner’s discretion.

Best Placement:

The Living Room

Along with the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen, what else can I do to breathe easier?

Although keeping oxygen-generating plants, such as our top 5 plants for increasing oxygen, may increase the quality of life for those suffering from COPD, they are not a form of treatment. And though indoor plants may ease the symptoms of COPD, they will be ineffective when outside the home or workplace.

Currently COPD has no cure; however, new discoveries are being made every day in the field of stem cell research. As the scientific community continues to put their best minds to the task of solving the problems and complications of the human body, the Lung Institute will continue to bring these advancements to the public with the hope of bettering quality of life.

If you’re looking to make a profound change in your life or the life of someone you love, the time is now. If you or a loved one suffers from COPD, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or another lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of stem cell treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 today to find out if you qualify for stem cell therapy.

Thinking about starting an indoor plant collection? Have a few suggestions of your own? We’d love to hear from you! Share your thoughts and comments on our list of the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen below!

23 Comments

  1. Pingback: Plants for a breath of fresh air | Nanoaire

  2. Pingback: The Best 5 Gifts for Someone with COPD | Lung Institute

  3. Teresa

    2 months ago

    I get Spiriva and Symbicort from Canada. They are generics and very reasonable. No way could I afford US prices.

  4. Pingback: Healthy Lung Month 2016 | Lung Institute

  5. Pingback: Lung Institute | Lung-Friendly Home

  6. Pingback: Lung Institute | 5 Simple Tips for Improving Low Blood Oxygen Levels

  7. Jan H/

    5 months ago

    On the plant article. It was very interesting, but the photos are confusing. Isnt what you’re calling a” money plant” actually a Jade plant? Also what you’re calling “Chinese Evergreen” looks like what I’d call a peace lily. More definition please. Also it would be nice for you to cite a reference so we could go directly to the source.

  8. Pingback: Lung Institute | 5 New Years Resolutions to Improve Your Life

  9. Mario

    6 months ago

    Thanks very much. It does actually. Please keep up the work you do. I know I’ve barely touched the surface regarding the benefits of your institute but I’ve come to notice how much impact things we view as little have on us when it comes to health and to be this is a huge benefit as simple as it may seem. Thank you for your patience and quick responses.

  10. PB

    6 months ago

    Dear Mario,

    To clarify, the plants will continue to take in carbon dioxide whether it’s day or night, and they will also continue to put out oxygen. As long as the plants have access to some sunlight during the day (even through a window) they will be just fine; as indoor plants, they can survive pretty well with minimal sunlight. Perhaps, on the weekends or when you’re not working, you can put them outside for a little while. They shouldn’t become confused by the lights when you’re working at night though. We hope this is helpful.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  11. Mario

    6 months ago

    Hi, thanks for such a quick response! I still don’t quite understand. Are you saying that at night when the process is reversed and carbon dioxide is given off instead while I’m the room with them, I won’t be affected?

    Also, regarding light is it then that as long as the light is on it will seem light daytime to them? Because my issue here is working at night in the room them.

  12. PB

    6 months ago

    Dear Mario,

    Thanks for your question. We’re glad you found this article useful. Because plants take in carbon dioxide and give off oxygen, there’s no need to remove them from the room. They will continue to give off oxygen no matter where they are placed. In regards to the lights, when you’re not using the office space, you could turn off the lights. However, it’s really up to you. We hope this is helpful for you.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  13. Mario

    6 months ago

    Hi, this is really useful information, thank you! I have tiny home office that is closed up 24/7 pretty much. There are no windows or any sort of ventilation. I aim to increase the oxygen level and clean up the air for my health.

    My questions are:

    1. Should I remove the plants that give off oxygen at night from the room during the day when I’m working because of the carbon dioxide emissions?

    2. Sometimes I work nights, should I then remove the daytime oxygen plants for the same reason?

    3. I assume lights determine how the plant decides it’s day or night? If so, do you have any suggestions how bright I’m allowed before the plant thinks, “Hey! Is it forever daytime here?!”

  14. Betty Brown

    7 months ago

    Spariva is sold in mx. Across the border from Yuma, ax. To bad the u.s. Can’t get are medicines for the price a third world country can. Spariva is sold in ax. For $ 315. 00 and across the border from az. It cost $30.00. How sad is that. Betty Brown

  15. Pingback: Lung Institute | 5 Ways to Improve Your Oxygen Levels

  16. Pingback: Lung Institute | 5 Tips to Increase your Blood Oxygen Naturally

  17. Pingback: Lung Institute | Can COPD Affect Your Sleep?

  18. Michael Buffington

    11 months ago

    Advir 500/50 is the best for my copd stage 4 and Medicaid will not approve it and I can’t afford it to me its not he best treatment I’ve fond seems to me Medicaid don’t care

  19. Pingback: Lung Institute| Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

  20. Lou

    12 months ago

    I buy a generic spiriva from Canada. It is canadarxconnection.com. They are very nice. I have used them when I get in the doughnut hole. It sure helps. I have used them for 5 years.

  21. Margaret

    12 months ago

    James, Spiriva has a prescription assistance program. Google for the link. If your prescription isn’t paying for it you may get it at a low price

  22. Cameron Kennerly

    12 months ago

    Hello James,

    This is actually a question for one of our patient coordinators. Their wealth of knowledge on the subject should be helpful to you and your journey for better health. For more information on alternative treatment options please feel free to contact us at 1-855-313-1149.

    We look forward to hearing from you James,

    -The Lung Institute

  23. James Bowen

    12 months ago

    Need any help you can give for inhalers that medicare will approve. Was on Spariva, now no longer covered. Looking for replacement. Thank you & Happy Holidays to you all.

Your Comment

Your email address will not be published.



* All treatments performed at Lung Institute utilize autologous stem cells, meaning those derived from a patient's own body. No fetal or embryonic stem cells are utilized in Lung Institute's procedures. Lung Institute aims to improve patients' quality of life and help them breathe easier through the use of autologous stem cell therapy. To learn more about how stem cells work for lung disease, click here.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

Under current FDA guidelines and regulations 1271.10 and 1271.15, the Lung Institute complies with all necessary requirements for operation. Any individual who accesses Lung Institute's website for information is encouraged to speak with his or her primary physician for treatment suggestions and conclusive evidence. All information on this site should be used for educational and informational use only.