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Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

15 Jul 2016
| Under Lifestyle, Lung Disease, Oxygen Levels | Posted by | 40 Comments
Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Looking for a natural way to increase oxygen indoors?

For those suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the desire for more oxygen can be a demanding one. Although there are options available for increasing oxygen through means such as oxygenators and air purifiers, there are a variety of natural alternatives for increasing air quality that are beneficial for both body and mind. The Lung Institute believes the home should foster an environment of good health and well-being, and with your health in mind, we’ve compiled a list of the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen indoors.

5. Areca Palm

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

As with all plants, the Areca Palm is biologically engineered to take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen. However, what sets the Areca Palm apart is its ability to also purify the environment it’s placed in by removing dangerous chemicals such as formaldehyde, xylene and toluene.

Recommendation & Care:

The Areca Palm does well in filtered light and needs to be watered often. For one person, four shoulder high plants should suffice.

Best Placement:

The Living Room

 4. Snake Plant a.k.a. Mother-In-Law’s Tongue

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Considered highly efficient in oxygen production, the Snake Plant otherwise known as the Mother-In-Law’s Tongue, is unique for its nighttime oxygen production, and ability to purify air through the removal of benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene and toluene.

Recommendation & Care:

The Snake Plant does well in window light and needs to be watered weekly. For one person, six to eight waist level plants are recommended. In an air sealed room, these plants are capable of producing enough oxygen to breathe normally.

Best Placement:

The Bedroom

3. Money Plant

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Featured by NASA, the Money Plant is renowned for its ability to remove chemicals and other pollutants from the air, specifically benzene, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene. However, despite the benefit of its high purification rate, this plant is toxic to cats, dogs and small children if its leaves are ingested.

Recommendation & Care:

The Money Plant prefers indirect light and needs to be watered every week or so. For one person, three 18-inch plants are recommended.

Best Placement:

Any room but keep out of reach of pets or small children.

2. Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera Jamesonii)

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

Arguably the prettiest entry on the list, the Gerbera Daisy is often used as a decorative element in gardening. However, the Gerbera Daisy is also distinct for its ability to produce high levels of oxygen at night while removing harmful chemicals, such as benzene and trichloroethylene. Beneficial for those suffering from sleep apnea and breathing disorders, keep this one on the nightstand for better sleep.

Recommendation & Care:

The Gerbera Daisy prefers bright sunlight during the summer, spring and fall, and indirect light during the winter. It needs to be watered regularly with the soil being kept moist. Due to the decorative nature of the flower, the amount of recommended flower pots is up to the discretion of the planter.

Best Placement:

The Bedroom

1. Chinese Evergreens

Top 5 Plants for Increasing Oxygen

The Chinese Evergreen is one of the most common household plants and for good reason. This plant emits a high oxygen content while purifying indoor spaces of harmful chemicals such as benzene, formaldehyde and other toxins. As its name suggests, it is quite popular in China specifically for its high efficiency in removing harmful pollutants from the air.

Recommendation & Care:

The Chinese Evergreen does well in full shade, and only needs to be watered occasionally with a focus on keeping the soil moist. The number of plants kept is at the owner’s discretion.

Best Placement:

The Living Room

Along with the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen, what else can I do to breathe easier?

Although keeping oxygen-generating plants, such as our top 5 plants for increasing oxygen, may increase the quality of life for those suffering from COPD, they are not a form of treatment. And though indoor plants may ease the symptoms of COPD, they will be ineffective when outside the home or workplace.

Currently COPD has no cure; however, new discoveries are being made every day in the field of cellular research. As the scientific community continues to put their best minds to the task of solving the problems and complications of the human body, the Lung Institute will continue to bring these advancements to the public with the hope of bettering quality of life.

If you’re looking to make a profound change in your life or the life of someone you love, the time is now. If you or a loved one suffers from COPD, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or another lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of cellular treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 today to find out if you qualify for cellular therapy.

Thinking about starting an indoor plant collection? Have a few suggestions of your own? We’d love to hear from you! Share your thoughts and comments on our list of the top 5 plants for increasing oxygen below!

40 Comments

  1. Lung Institute

    4 months ago

    Shilo:

    Thank you for your question. We are providing a link to an article that details indoor plants that NASA recommends.

    The health, size and suitability of your plant to your indoor growing environment determine how much oxygen it produces and the amount of harmful chemicals it removes from the air. Plants that are adapted to direct sunlight will produce the most oxygen when they are kept in front of a window with a southern exposure. The effect of plants on your indoor oxygen levels is also influenced by how many plants you have. NASA studies indicate that 15 to 18 plants in 6- to 8-inch-diameter pots will sufficiently improve the air in an 1,800-square-foot residential home. This translates to approximately one large potted plant or two smaller potted plants about every 100 square feet.

    We’re happy to answer your questions about cellular therapy for COPD. Our dedicated medical team has a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment options, candidacy and more. So, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak one-on-one with someone from our medical team over our secure phone line. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  2. SHILO

    4 months ago

    hi,
    wHICH plants provide THE MOST OXYGEN, RELATIVE TO THEIR SIZE, DURING THE DAY?

  3. Lung Institute

    4 months ago

    Bill:

    Thank you for the question. It is hard to say just how much oxygen levels increase with the addition of houseplants. We do not have any data that would provide the information you are looking for. We can offer this link to an article that attempts to explain it. We hope this helps.

    We’re happy to answer your questions, so feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  4. Bill Fairplay CO

    4 months ago

    I know this is a 2 year old article, but if you’re still replying to comments: I have 7 waist-high snake plants ( I loved my mother-in-love) in my bedroom at 2 miles elevation, 10,650 ft. oxygen levels are 2/3 of sea level (14 vs. 21 %) Do you have any test data that measures the O2 increase with plants?

  5. Lung Institute

    7 months ago

    Gabe:

    Thank you for your questions. We did not find any specific recommendations for how many plants in a 150 sqft room, but we did find recommendations for about 15-18 plants for an 1,800-2,000 sqft house. That would break down to about 2-3 plants per room. The Chinese Evergreens can grow to be somewhat large so you probably don’t need more than a couple. When it’s young, it is small enough to fit on desks, tabletops, and other surfaces. It’s a slow-growing plant, so you can enjoy it without worrying if it will grow out of bounds. Older, larger plants are suited to growing on the floor, in corners, next to furniture, or as an accent piece along a wall.

    We have a dedicated medical team who have a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment options, candidacy, cost and more. So, feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  6. Gabe

    7 months ago

    I have two questions. First, On a few plants, you said that the amount of recommended plants is to the OWNER’S DISCRETION. Does that mean that it doesn’t matter the amount of plants you have in your room? How many Chinese evergreens would you recommend me to have in a roughly 150 SQUARE foot room? Also, on the Chinese Evergreen plant, does it need any light to produce oxygen? And if so, can I use artificial light?

  7. Lung Institute

    8 months ago

    Abhimanyu:

    Thank you for your comment regarding houseplants and oxygen at night. We had to do a little research on this. First off, if you have plants in your house or your room their effect on releasing CO2 at night would be extremely negligible, so you should not be concerned. With that being said, most plants do not release oxygen at night, they typically do that during sunlight, but our research found there are plants that do release oxygen at night. We have found an article that lists the most common plants that release oxygen at night. We hope this helps.

    Our dedicated medical team has a wealth of knowledge about cellular therapy, treatment options, candidacy, cost and more. We’re happy to answer your questions, so feel free to give us a call at (855) 313-1149. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  8. ABHIMANYU SHARMA

    8 months ago

    Ive kept the below mentioned plants in my bedroom having little shade and no direct sunlight.

    my question to you is that i need a list of plant which are releasing “Oxygen at night”. otherwise, if releasing co2 at night, then keeping them in bedroom for long might be very bad for health.

    areca palm
    spider plant
    peace lilly
    english ivy
    chinese evergreen
    orchid
    jasmine
    Snake plant (oxygen at night)
    aloe vera (oxygen at night)

  9. Lung Institute

    8 months ago

    Janet:

    Thank you for your comment. We were not aware of the toxicity of these plants to animals, especially dogs. We are inspired to do more research and provide you and others with a list of pet-friendly plants that are good for those people with lung disease. In the meantime, here is another article we found about pet-friendly houseplants.

    Sincerely,

    The Lung Institute

  10. Janet

    8 months ago

    All the plants you listed are toxic to dogs. Do you have one you can recommend that isn’t?

  11. Lung Institute

    9 months ago

    Michelle:

    Thank you for the question. The general rule is to have one plant for every 100 square feet. That is basically a 10×10 room. It doesn’t matter which of the plants listed you use. They all help to purify the air.

    We’re also happy to answer your questions about cellular treatment for chronic lung diseases, so feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149 to speak with our knowledgeable medical team. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Kind regards,

    The Lung Institute

  12. Elsie

    10 months ago

    I am on onoro and i have humana advantage so they should help pay for some brand

  13. michelle

    11 months ago

    Do you put all the plants listed in your room.or should i just stick to 1 kind of plant?

  14. Phoebe

    11 months ago

    Hi Marie,

    If you’re concerned about toxins in your home, we suggest contacting a local air quality expert. An air quality expert can test the air in your home, the air outside your home and guide you about improving the air quality. In addition, if you’re concerned about the chemicals your neighbors may be spraying in their yard, you may want to consider calling your local, non-emergency phone line for the authorities in your area. They will be able to answer your questions, help you and direct you to the next steps.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  15. marie

    11 months ago

    I live next door to people who are spraying some toxins -we share a wall-where can I report them–I can’t even go into the living room-it smells like car exhaust seeping through the walls.

  16. Rhoda

    1 year ago

    I have CEP (Chronic EosinOphilic Pneumonia)

  17. Phoebe

    1 year ago

    Dear Larry,

    Thanks for your comment. We’re glad to hear that you’re feeling better and breathing easier after treatment. Feel free to reach out to your patient coordinator to share your good news, and keep us updated on your progress. We wish you the best, and we’re here if you have any questions or want to share more good news. So, feel free to contact us at (855) 313-1149.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  18. Larry. Bushong

    1 year ago

    Had cellular treatment 3wks. Ago can already breathe easier.

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  20. Teresa

    2 years ago

    I get Spiriva and Symbicort from Canada. They are generics and very reasonable. No way could I afford US prices.

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  24. Jan H/

    2 years ago

    On the plant article. It was very interesting, but the photos are confusing. Isnt what you’re calling a” money plant” actually a Jade plant? Also what you’re calling “Chinese Evergreen” looks like what I’d call a peace lily. More definition please. Also it would be nice for you to cite a reference so we could go directly to the source.

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  26. Mario

    2 years ago

    Thanks very much. It does actually. Please keep up the work you do. I know I’ve barely touched the surface regarding the benefits of your institute but I’ve come to notice how much impact things we view as little have on us when it comes to health and to be this is a huge benefit as simple as it may seem. Thank you for your patience and quick responses.

  27. PB

    2 years ago

    Dear Mario,

    To clarify, the plants will continue to take in carbon dioxide whether it’s day or night, and they will also continue to put out oxygen. As long as the plants have access to some sunlight during the day (even through a window) they will be just fine; as indoor plants, they can survive pretty well with minimal sunlight. Perhaps, on the weekends or when you’re not working, you can put them outside for a little while. They shouldn’t become confused by the lights when you’re working at night though. We hope this is helpful.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  28. Mario

    2 years ago

    Hi, thanks for such a quick response! I still don’t quite understand. Are you saying that at night when the process is reversed and carbon dioxide is given off instead while I’m the room with them, I won’t be affected?

    Also, regarding light is it then that as long as the light is on it will seem light daytime to them? Because my issue here is working at night in the room them.

  29. PB

    2 years ago

    Dear Mario,

    Thanks for your question. We’re glad you found this article useful. Because plants take in carbon dioxide and give off oxygen, there’s no need to remove them from the room. They will continue to give off oxygen no matter where they are placed. In regards to the lights, when you’re not using the office space, you could turn off the lights. However, it’s really up to you. We hope this is helpful for you.

    Best Regards,

    The Lung Institute

  30. Mario

    2 years ago

    Hi, this is really useful information, thank you! I have tiny home office that is closed up 24/7 pretty much. There are no windows or any sort of ventilation. I aim to increase the oxygen level and clean up the air for my health.

    My questions are:

    1. Should I remove the plants that give off oxygen at night from the room during the day when I’m working because of the carbon dioxide emissions?

    2. Sometimes I work nights, should I then remove the daytime oxygen plants for the same reason?

    3. I assume lights determine how the plant decides it’s day or night? If so, do you have any suggestions how bright I’m allowed before the plant thinks, “Hey! Is it forever daytime here?!”

  31. Betty Brown

    2 years ago

    Spariva is sold in mx. Across the border from Yuma, ax. To bad the u.s. Can’t get are medicines for the price a third world country can. Spariva is sold in ax. For $ 315. 00 and across the border from az. It cost $30.00. How sad is that. Betty Brown

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  35. Advir 500/50 is the best for my copd stage 4 and Medicaid will not approve it and I can’t afford it to me its not he best treatment I’ve fond seems to me Medicaid don’t care

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  37. Lou

    2 years ago

    I buy a generic spiriva from Canada. It is canadarxconnection.com. They are very nice. I have used them when I get in the doughnut hole. It sure helps. I have used them for 5 years.

  38. Margaret

    2 years ago

    James, Spiriva has a prescription assistance program. Google for the link. If your prescription isn’t paying for it you may get it at a low price

  39. Cameron Kennerly

    2 years ago

    Hello James,

    This is actually a question for one of our patient coordinators. Their wealth of knowledge on the subject should be helpful to you and your journey for better health. For more information on alternative treatment options please feel free to contact us at 1-855-313-1149.

    We look forward to hearing from you James,

    -The Lung Institute

  40. James Bowen

    2 years ago

    Need any help you can give for inhalers that medicare will approve. Was on Spariva, now no longer covered. Looking for replacement. Thank you & Happy Holidays to you all.

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