Pulmonary Fibrosis

Lung Disease

PulmonaryFibrosis

What is Pulmonary Fibrosis?

Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease that scars the lungs, causing intricate pulmonary passageways to thicken and harden and obstructing the free passage of oxygen through the walls of the lungs’ tiny air sacs (alveoli) into the bloodstream. The resulting lack of oxygen in the bloodstream leaves pulmonary fibrosis sufferers short of breath even after periods of prolonged rest. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a form of pulmonary fibrosis with no known cause.

Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive disease that varies in the rate of degeneration from person to person. This condition is part of a group of conditions referred to as interstitial lung disease.

The term interstitial lung disease refers to conditions that lead to inflammation or scarring of the lung’s delicate tissues. Some autoimmune disorders, specifically connective tissue disorders like rheumatoid arthritis can cause interstitial lung disease.

Scarring of the lungs is irreversible, and there is no cure for pulmonary fibrosis. However, treatment options are available.

Who can develop pulmonary fibrosis?

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has no specific demographic. However, it does affect men more than women. It typically occurs in individuals between the age of 50 and 70, and has an increased risk for individuals who smoke cigarettes.

Researchers are still studying to determine a specific cause of this condition.

Symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis

The symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis differ by individual, but the most common symptoms include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Dry, chronic cough
  • Fast breathing
  • Constant fatigue
  • Aching joints and muscles
  • Clubbing (widening and rounding) of the fingers and/or toes

These symptoms are indicators that you may have pulmonary fibrosis or a similar condition. If you are experiencing any or all of these symptoms, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor to determine the cause of your symptoms and the treatment options available to you. Often, your doctor will walk you through a simple diagnosis to determine if you have pulmonary fibrosis or a similar condition.

Diagnosing pulmonary fibrosis

Once you make an appointment with your doctor to determine if you have pulmonary fibrosis, your doctor will walk you through a couple diagnostic tests. Each patient is different, and you may not require all of the steps in the diagnosis process.

A typical pulmonary fibrosis diagnosis includes the following tests:

  • A conversation with your doctor about your family’s medical history
  • A question session about your medical history and lifestyle choices
  • A physical examination where the doctor listens to your lungs
  • A pulmonary function test that measures your lung capacity and function

In some cases, a doctor may recommend an X-ray and lab work to determine the severity of your condition. Pulmonary fibrosis, like most chronic lung diseases, is a progressive condition that worsens over time. Before your doctor can accurately recommend treatment, he or she must identify the severity of your condition.

Treatment options for pulmonary fibrosis

Typically, patients who have been diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis do not live more than five years after a diagnosis. However, there are new treatment options available that can not only help reduce your symptoms when they occur, but they can also help to slow the progression of your disease.

Most doctors recommend traditional treatment for pulmonary fibrosis. Traditional pulmonary fibrosis treatment helps lessen your symptoms when they occur, but it does not prevent them from occurring. These treatments focus more on maintenance than prevention. For example, an inhaler is one of the most common methods of pulmonary fibrosis treatment. An inhaler helps to open your airways in the midst of an airway attack when you cannot get enough air into your lungs. It doesn’t prevent you from having the attack to begin with.

This is the case for most of the traditional treatments available for pulmonary fibrosis, such as:

  • Steroid or other medications
  • Inhalers
  • Oxygen therapy

At the Lung Institute, we believe that patients deserve better than masking symptoms. That is why our cellular therapy targets the root source of your symptoms, which is the inflammation in your lungs. We use the cells harvested from your own body to help target and reduce lung inflammation so you can Breathe Easier.

To date, we’ve performed more than 6,500 procedures, and 85 percent of patients^ report an improvement in their quality of life within three months of receiving our cellular therapy treatment.

It’s time to take your life back from pulmonary fibrosis. If you would like to find out more about our available treatment options, please contact one of our patient care coordinators today at (888) 510-9356 to schedule a free consultation.

Related Posts

  • Pulmonary fibrosis causes scar tissue to form in the lungs’ air sacs, making it more difficult for the lungs to deliver oxygen to the bloodstream. A type of interstitial lung ... Read more
  • How do non-smokers get pulmonary fibrosis?How do non-smokers get pulmonary fibrosis? While the specific cause may be unknown, there are a few possible causes. Learn more about pulmonary fibrosis causes and treatments here. Read more

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months of COPD patients.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.